Why stop at pronouns?

My adjectives: timid, arrogant, insufferable.

My adverbs: (just one in fact) inadvertently

My gerunds: painstaking, running away, whining

My verbs: irritate, disappoint

My prepositions: notwithstanding, in spite of, away from

My conjunction: even though

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A problem child?

The latest issue of the New York Review of Books contains a book review by George Stauffer about Alban Berg with this bewildering sentence about Berg’s childhood:

He showed few signs of musical talent as a youth aside from informal piano lessons, reading through the scores of songs and operas, and playing four-hand arrangements of orchestral and chamber works with his sister, Smaragda.

Well, well… “Aside from”? If you had a child who could only read through lots of opera scores and play four-hand arrangements of symphonies, would you immediately get to the logical conclusion that he is devoid of musical talent?

(Sorry about poor Alban, he is the shame of our family, let’s just hope Smaragda won’t turn out to be such an abject musical failure.)

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One way to become a top scientist…

… is to have a top scientist spot your talent and encourage you, however humble your status may be then.

Wikipedia has a terse entry about Dirk Rembrandtsz (with “sz” at the end), presented as a “seventeenth-century Dutch cartographer, mathematician, surveyor, astronomer, teacher and [religious dignitary]” with “more than thirty scientific publications to his name” and various inventions. Seems just like another early scientific career, but digging a bit deeper reveals that the story goes beyond the ordinary.

The reason I looked up Rembrandtsz is that I ran into the following mention in a seminal book about Descartes, by Geneviève Rodis-Lewis (Calmann-Lévy, 1995). I did not know about Rodis-Lewis herself even though I now realize she was an impressive personality with a remarkable if difficult career (there is an entry about her in French Wikipedia). Here is the relevant extract from her book (pages 255-256), part of the story of Descartes’s years in the Netherlands. The translation is mine, as well as comments in brackets.

During the last years of his life in the Netherlands, Descartes had several opportunities to show [his] interest in people of very modest means. Baillet [Descartes’s first biographer, in the 17-th century] did not give the exact date of the first visit of a “peasant from Holland”, a “shoemaker” by trade, who was studying mathematics in books in vulgar language. [That is to say, not in Latin, presumably in Dutch or French.] When he came for the first time to Egmond [Descartes’s residence] and asked to see Descartes, the servants sent him away. Dirk Rembrandtsz “came back two or three months later”, insisting on being brought in. “His external appearance did nothing to help him get a better reception than before.” Descartes was told, however, of the return of this “annoying beggar” who obviously “wanted to talk philosophy with the purpose of getting some alms”. “Descartes sent him some money, which he refused, saying that he hoped that a third journey would be more productive than the first two.” When Descartes heard about this answer, he gave orders to receive him. “Rembrandtsz came back a few months later” and Descartes was able to appreciate “his skill and merit”. He helped him overcome difficulties and shared his method with him. “He added him to the circle of his friends.” Rembrandtsz “became, through studying with Descartes, one of the premier astronomers of this century”.

I find this story moving. The passionate, stubborn autodidact, determined to reach the highest steps in science in spite of miserable circumstances. The rejection by the servants, from instinctive class-based prejudices. The great scientist’s ability to overcome such prejudice and recognize a kindred, noble spirit and his devotion to the pursuit of knowledge. His generosity, his openness, his availability in spite of the many demands on his time. His encouragement to a young, unknown disciple. The numerous encounters which begin as lessons from a master and evolve towards a relationship of peers. And the later success of the aspiring scientist.

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Mr. and Mrs. Bei Uns

It is customary for an article to carry some kind of lesson or moral. This one does not. Or to be more exact it does have a lesson, several perhaps, but they are left to the reader to draw.

It is also customary, for an article that is written as a tribute to deceased people, that the writer would have known them. I never knew the protagonists of my chronicle. But my sister and I — along with a dear cousin, and I hope her children and grandchildren — are among the few people who still know they existed. Hence the need for a tribute lest the last traces of their stay on earth vanish forever.

They were German: Louis Bernheimer, born on 5 December 1875 in Issenhausen in Alsace, then part of Germany, and his wife Paola, born in Bayreuth on 12 February 1879, yes, that same Bayreuth where Wagner had premièred his quintessential German opera, Das Rheingold, three years before. They were German and seemingly, as we shall see, very German.

I know little about them, nothing else in fact than reported in this little note. One thing I do know is the nickname by which people in Paris called them behind their backs: “Mr. and Mrs. Bei Uns”. I know it because my father mentioned it to me. Just once, a long time ago, but I remember.

We need a bit of context. Herr und Frau Bernheimer flew Nazi Germany in the thirties with their son Fred, a young professional photographer, and settled to a safe place, or a place they thought was safe: Paris. There Fred met my father’s sister Éliane and married her; they had two children, my cousins. Now we are talking about the only people in this story whom I did know. Éliane was a strong personality, a dedicated feminist and activist. When her husband was hit with cancer and she abruptly found herself a widow with two young children and no resources, she took over his photography studio, learned the trade — about which she had known nothing — and made the business prosper. After the war, Studio Bernheim (the name shortened so that it would sound less German) became one of the fashionable addresses in Paris, thanks to both Éliane and her son Marc who trained himself to become its chief photographer while still a teenager.

Bei uns in German means the same as “chez nous” in French and translates as “at our home”, although that is not a good translation because English lacks a preposition that would accurately reflect the French “chez” or (in that sense) the German “bei”, which mean something like “in the home of”.  “Home” in a very intense and cozy sense, not just the physical house, but encompassing culture, country, community. Russians similarly say “U Nas”, literally “at ours” and, when talking about people, “Nashi”, literally “ours”, our people that is. In a Chekhov novella entitled  A boring story (full text available online here), when the antisemitic narrator wants to mention that at the theater last night the person seated in front of him was a Jew, he says that he was sitting behind an “iz nasikh”, a deformation with a fake Jewish accent of “iz nashikh”, one from our own, to suggest — ironically in light of the rest of my own boring story — a member of a tightly knit community.

It seems that the Bernheimers (to come back to them) were seen by their new extended family as stuffy Germans fitting the stereotypes. Not just stuffy: critical. Apparently, they went around commenting that whatever was being done in their new French surroundings was not being done right, and explaining the way it was done back home, “bei uns”. If so, it was perhaps not the best way to ingratiate themselves with their hosts, and it is not surprising that people in the family started referring to them acerbically, according to my father, as Mr. and Mrs. Bei Uns.

As noted, I never knew the Bernheimers, although in a different turn of the story I would — I should — have known them as a child. Therefore I cannot guess whether I would have yielded to family opinions and found them insufferable, or liked them as delightful, exotic older relatives having gone through hard times and now doting on their children, grandchildren, nephews and nieces. Maybe both. I feel a certain remote sympathy for them in any case, having probably been resented, like anyone who has lived in countries where people insist on the “korrekt” way of doing things and comes back to more lackadaisical cultures, as a bit of a Mr. Bei Uns myself.

The irony is that in the eyes of many people, including many who would never consider themselves antisemites, Jews still have the reputation of harboring a feeling of  solidarity with their own kin that transcends borders and trumps national allegiance. Here we have the reverse. Highly assimilated families on both sides, French Jews and German Jews, getting into a cultural conflict because some were French and some were German. Ever since the revolution emancipated French Jews, they have been passionately French. German Jews were just as passionately German (in the style of Heinrich Heine’s I think of Germany in the night, the poem entitled Nachtgedanken, written in exile in Paris, see its text here).  French Jews do not ask themselves how French their are, since their Frenchness is as obvious to them as the air they breathe; it’s others who want them to prove it again and again — something that no one ever seems to require of people from certain regions of France such as Brittany whose inhabitants have a loudly proclaimed attachment to their terroir of origin. Unbelievably, the question still resurfaces regularly; it is even a theme in the current presidential campaign.

Why did I never get to decide by myself who Mr. and Mrs. Bei Uns really were: chauvinistic scolds, or a charming old-world couple? If they thought of themselves as German, as part of “uns”, the “uns” ruling Germany had a different understanding. When Germany invaded France in 1940, the Bernheimers flew, like many others, to the South of France, which until 1942 remained a supposedly “free” zone. Then the Germans invaded the “free” zone too. In August of 1943 Mr. and Mrs Bei Uns were rounded up near Bayonne. The town is close to the Spanish border; I do not know if they had hoped to cross over, as others managed to do. They were interned in the Mérignac camp, where Bordeaux airport lies today. From Bordeaux they were transferred to the infamous camp at Drancy, near Paris. From there they were put on convoy number 26 to Auschwitz, where they were murdered.

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PhD and postdoc positions in verification in Switzerland

The Chair of Software Engineering, my group at the Schaffhausen Institute of Technology in Switzerland (SIT), has open positions for both PhD students and postdocs. We are looking for candidates with a passion for reliable software and a mix of theoretical knowledge and practical experience in software engineering. Candidates should have degrees in computer science or related fields: a doctorate for postdoc positions, a master’s degree for PhD positions. Postdoc candidates should have a substantial publication record. Experience is expected in one or more of the following fields:

  • Software verification (axiomatic, model-checking, abstract interpretation etc.).
  • Advanced techniques of software testing.
  • Formal methods, semantics of programming languages.
  • Concurrent programming.
  • Design by Contract, Eiffel, techniques of correctness-by-construction.

Some of the work involves the AutoProof framework, under development at SIT (earlier at ETH), although other topics are also available, particularly in static analysis.

Compensation is attractive. Candidates must have the credentials to work in Switzerland (typically, citizenship or residence in Switzerland or the EU). Although we work in part remotely like everyone else these days, the positions are residential.

Interested candidates should send a CV and relevant documents or links (and any questions) to bm@sit.org.

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Panel on methodology and agility, this Monday (20 September)

Today (well, tomorrow as of writing, but when you see this it will probably be today for you) I am participating in a panel discussion with Ivar Jacobson, Robert Martin and Carlos Zapata on “The Future of Methods”, hosted by the SEMAT/Essence movement. It takes place at 18:30 CET (i.e. Paris/Zurich etc.), 12:30 EDT, 9:30 in California. It’s free, but requires registration at https://www.meetup.com/essence-for-agility/events/280316615/.

Should be a good discussion!

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A standard plan for modern requirements

Requirements documents for software projects in industry, agile or not, typically follow a plan defined in a 1998 IEEE standard (IEEE 830-1998 [1]),  “reaffirmed” in 2009. IEEE 830 has the merit of simplicity, as it fits in 37 pages of which just a few (competently) describe basic requirements concepts and less than 10 are devoted to explaining the standard recommended plan, which itself consists of 3 sections with subsections. Simplicity is good but the elementary nature of the IEEE-830 plan is just not up to the challenges of modern information technology. It is time to retire this venerable precursor and move to a structure that works for the kind of ambitious, multi-faceted IT systems we build today.

For the past few years I have worked on defining a systematic approach to requirements, culminating in a book to be published in the Fall, Handbook of Requirements and Business Analysis. One of the results of this effort is a standard plan, based on the “PEGS” view of requirements where the four parts cover Project, Environment, Goals and System. The details are in the book (for some of the basic concepts see a paper at TOOLS 2019, [2]). Here I will introduce some of the key principles, since they are already  be used — as various people have done since I first started presenting the ideas in courses and seminars (particularly an ACM Webinar, organized by Will Tracz last March, whose recording is available on YouTube, and another hosted by Grady Booch for IBM).

pegs

The starting point, which gives its name to the approach, is that requirements should cover the four aspects mentioned, the four “PEGS”, defined as follows:

  • A Goal is a result desired by an organization.
  • A System is a set of related artifacts, devised to help meet certain goals.
  • A Project is the set of human processes involved in the planning, construction, revision and  operation of a system.
  • An Environment is the set of entities (such as people, organizations, devices and other material objects, regulations and other systems) external to the project and system but with the potential to affect the goals, project or system or to be affected by them.

The recommended standard plan consequently consists of four parts or books.

This proposed standard does not prescribe any particular approach to project management, software development, project lifecycle or requirements expression, and is applicable in particular to both traditional (“waterfall”) and agile projects. It treats requirements as a project activity, not necessarily a lifecycle step. One of the principles developed in the book is that requirements should be treated as a dynamic asset of the project, written in a provisional form (more or less detailed depending on the project methodology) at the beginning of the project, and then regularly extended and updated.

Similarly, the requirements can be written using any appropriate notation and method, from the most informal to the most mathematical.  In a recently published ACM Computing Surveys paper [3], my colleagues and I reviewed the various levels of formalism available  in today’s requirements approaches. The standard plan is agnostic with respect to this matter.

The books may reference each other but not arbitrarily. The permitted relations are as follows:

references

Note in particular that the description of the Goals should leave out technical details and hence may not refer to Project and System elements, although it may need to explain the properties of the Environment that influence or constrain the business goals. The Environment exists independently of the IT effort, and hence the Environment book should not reference any of the others, with the possible exception (dotted arrow in the figure) of effects of the System if it is to change the environment. (For example, a payroll IT system may affect the payroll process; a heating system may affect the ambient temperature.)

The multi-book structure of the recommended PEGS standard plan already goes beyond the traditional view of a single, linear “requirements document”. The books themselves are not necessarily written as linear texts; with today’s technology, requirements parts can and generally should be stored in a requirements repository which includes all requirements-relevant elements.  A linear form remains necessary; it can be either written as such or produced by tools from elements in the repository.

The standard plan defines the structure of the four PEGS books down to one more level, chapters. For any further levels (sections), each organization can define its own rules. Books can also include front and back matter, including for example  tables of contents, legal disclaimers, revision history etc., not covered by the standard structure. Here is that structure:

books

It is meant to be self-explanatory, but here are a few comments on each of the books:

  • One of the products of the requirements effort should be to help plan and manage  the rest of the Project. This is the goal of the Project book; note in particular P.4 and P.5 covering tasks and deadlines. P.7 starts out at the beginning of the project as a blueprint for the requirements effort, and as this effort proceeds (stakeholder interviews, stakeholder workshops, competitive analysis, requirements writing …) can be regularly updated to report on how it went. (This feature is an example of treating the requirements repository and documents as a living, dynamic asset, as noted above.)
  • In the Environment book, constraints (E.3) are properties of the environment (the problem domain) imposed on the project and system. Effects (E.5) go the other way around, describing how the system may affect the environment. Invariants (E.6) do both. Assumptions (E.4) are properties that are taken for granted to simplify the construction of the system (for example, a maximum number of simultaneous users), as distinct from actual constraints.
  • The Goals book is intended for a less technical audience than the other books: it must be understandable to decision makers and non-IT-savvy stakeholders. It includes a short summary (G.4) of functionality, a kind of capsule version of the System book trimmed down to the essentials. Note the importance of specifying (in G.6) what aspects the system is not intended to address. The Goals book can include some (G.5) usage scenarios expressed in terms meaningful to the book’s constituencies and hence remaining at a high level of generality.
  • Detailed usage scenarios will appear in the System book (S.4).  It is important to prioritize the functions (S.5), allowing a reasoned approach (rather than decisions made in a panic) if the project hits roadblocks and must sacrifice some of the functionality.

A naïve but still widely encountered view of requirements is that they serve to  “describe what the system will do” (independently of how it will do it). In the structure above, it corresponds to just one-fourth of the requirements effort, the System part. Work on requirements engineering in the past few decades has emphasized, among other concepts, the need to separate system and environment properties (Michael Jackson, Pamela Zave) and the importance of goals (Axel van Lamsweerde).

The plan reflects this richness of the requirements concept and I hope it can help many projects produce better requirements for better software.

References

[1] IEEE 830-1998, available here.

[2] Bertrand Meyer, Jean-Michel Bruel, Sophie Ebersold, Florian Galinier and Alexandr Naumchev: The Anatomy of Software Requirements, in TOOLS 2019, Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science 11771, 2019, pages 10-40.

[3] Jean-Michel Bruel, Sophie Ebersold, Florian Galinier, Manuel Mazzara, Alexander Naumchev and Bertrand Meyer:  The Role of Formalism in System Requirements, in  Computing Surveys (ACM), vol. 54, no. 5, June 2021, pages 1-36, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3448975, preprint available here.

RecycledA version of this article appeared earlier in the Communications of the ACM blog.

 

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Publication announcement: survey on requirements techniques, formal and non-formal

There is a new paper out, several years in the making:

The Role of Formalism in System Requirements
Jean-Michel Bruel, Sophie Ebersold, Florian Galinier, Manuel Mazzara, Alexander Naumchev, Bertrand Meyer
Computing Surveys (ACM), vol. 54, no. 5, June 2021, pages 1-36
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3448975
Preprint available here.

The authors are from the Schaffhausen Institute of Technology in Switzerland, the University of Toulouse in France and Innopolis University in Russia. We make up a cross-institutional (and unofficial) research group which has for several years now been working on improving the state of software requirements, with both an engineering perspective and an interest in taking advantage of formal methods.

The article follows this combined formal-informal approach by reviewing the principal formal methods in requirements but also taking into consideration non-formal ones — including techniques widely used in industry, such as DOORS — and studying how they can be used in a more systematic way. It uses a significant example (a “Landing Gear System” or LGS for aircraft) to compare them and includes extensive tables comparing the approaches along a number of systematic criteria.

Here is the abstract:

A major determinant of the quality of software systems is the quality of their requirements, which should be both understandable and precise. Most requirements are written in natural language, which is good for understandability but lacks precision.

To make requirements precise, researchers have for years advocated the use of mathematics-based notations and methods, known as “formal.” Many exist, differing in their style, scope, and applicability.

The present survey discusses some of the main formal approaches and compares them to informal methods.The analysis uses a set of nine complementary criteria, such as level of abstraction, tool availability, and traceability support. It classifies the approaches into five categories based on their principal style for specifying requirements: natural-language, semi-formal, automata/graphs, mathematical, and seamless (programming-language-based). It includes examples from all of these categories, altogether 21 different approaches, including for example SysML, Relax, Eiffel, Event-B, and Alloy.

The review discusses a number of open questions, including seamlessness, the role of tools and education, and how to make industrial applications benefit more from the contributions of formal approaches.

For me, of course, this work is the continuation of a long-running interest in requirements and specifications and how to express them using the tools of mathematics, starting with a 1985 paper, still being cited today, with a strikingly similar title: On Formalism in Specifications.

Trivia: the “response to referees” (there were no fewer than eight of them!) after the first review took up 85 pages. Maybe not for the Guinness Book, but definitely a personal record. (And an opportunity to thank the referees for detailed comments that considerably helped shape the final form of the paper.)

Correction (20 July 2021): I just noted that I had forgotten to list myself among the authors! Not a sign of modesty (I don’t have any), more of absent-mindedness. Now corrected.

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On beauty and software (online talk on Wednesday, 17 CET / 11 EDT / 8 PDT)

This Wednesday (still “tomorrow” as I am writing this), 10 March 2021, I am giving a talk on “The Beauty of Software” on the occasion of the graduation ceremony of the first students of the Schaffhausen Institute of Technology. The event starts at 17 Schaffhausen/Zurich/Paris etc. time (11 AM New York, 8 AM San Francisco) and my own talk, starting half an hour later, will take about one hour.

The talk is (surprise!) given online. Registration is free but required: you can find the registration form on the announcement page here.

The abstract appears below. It is rather ambitious-sounding and I cannot promise the talk will live up to the promise, but I feel it necessary at least to attempt some initial steps towards a better understanding of beauty in software, which might help understand beauty in general.

The Beauty of Software

Software runs the world and delivers riches. Every passionate software engineer or computer scientist is also attuned to another of its features: the study and practice of software construction reveal gems of utter beauty.

While the concept of beauty is most naturally associated with art, scientists and engineers of all fields often invoke it. Beauty is a strong guiding principle in searching for solutions to scientific and technical problems, and arbitrating between rival candidate solutions. The reaction is often instinctive: “What an elegant theory!” “This technique is too ugly to be a viable approach”.

What do such appeals to beauty really mean? Do they pertain to the same concept of beauty as found in nature and art? Is beauty only “in the eye of the beholder”, is it conditioned by cultural prejudices, or does it submit to an objective definition?

In this talk, an initial step towards a more extensive study of what beauty means for software, I will present a few artifacts from software engineering and computer science which I find strikingly beautiful and – at the risk of breaking the charm – analyze what might make them so. This analysis will lead to a tentative definition of a notion both alluring and elusive: beauty.

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Tomorrow (Thursday) noon EDT: ACM talk on requirements

In the software engineering family requirements engineering is in my experience the poor cousin, lagging behind the progress of other parts (such as design). I have been devoting attention to the topic in recent months and am completing a book on the topic.

Tomorrow (Thursday), I will be covering some of the material in a one-hour Tech Talk for ACM, with the title

The Four PEGS of Requirements Engineering

The time is Thursday, 4 March 2021, at noon EDT (New York) and 18 CET (Paris, Zurich etc.). Attendance is free but requires registration, on the event page  here.

Abstract:

Bad software requirements can jeopardize projects. There is a considerable literature on requirements, but practice is far behind: what passes for requirements in industry usually consists of a few use cases or user stories, which are useful but not sufficient as a solution. Can we fix requirements engineering (known in other circles as business analysis) so that it is no longer the weak link in software engineering?

I will present ongoing work intended to help industry produce more useful requirements. It includes precise definitions of requirements concepts and a standard plan for requirements specifications, intended to replace the venerable but woefully obsolete IEEE standard from 1998. The plan contains four books covering the four “PEGS” of requirements engineering (which I will explain). The approach builds on existing knowledge to define a practical basis for requirements engineering and provide projects with precise and helpful guidelines.

This is I think the fourth time I am giving talks in this venue (previous talks were about Design by Contract, Agile Methods and Concurrency).

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Some contributions

Science progresses through people taking advantage of others’ insights and inventions. One of the conditions that makes the game possible is that you acknowledge what you take. For the originator, it is rewarding to see one’s ideas reused, but frustrating when that happens without acknowledgment, especially when you are yourself punctilious about citing your own sources of inspiration.

I have started to record some concepts that are widely known and applied today and which I believe I originated in whole or in part, whether or not their origin is cited by those who took them. The list below is not complete and I may update it in the future. It is not a list of ideas I contributed, only of those fulfilling two criteria:

  • Others have built upon them.  (If there is an idea that I think is great but no one paid attention to it, the list does not include it.)
  • They have gained wide visibility.

There is a narcissistic aspect to this exercise and if people want to dismiss it as just showing I am full of myself so be it. I am just a little tired of being given papers to referee that state that genericity was invented by Java, that no one ever thought of refactoring before agile methods, and so on. It is finally time to state some facts.

Facts indeed: I back every assertion by precise references. So if I am wrong — i.e. someone preceded me — the claims of precedence can be refuted; if so I will update or remove them. All articles by me cited in this note are available (as downloadable PDFs) on my publication page. (The page is up to date until 2018; I am in the process of adding newer publications.)

Post-publication note: I have started to receive some comments and added them in a Notes section at the end; references to those notes are in the format [A].

Final disclaimer (about the narcissistic aspect): the exercise of collecting such of that information was new for me, as I do not usually spend time reflecting on the past. I am much more interested in the future and definitely hope that my next contributions will eclipse any of the ones listed below.

Programming concepts: substitution principle

Far from me any wish to under-represent the seminal contributions of Barbara Liskov, particularly her invention of the concept of abstract data type on which so much relies. As far as I can tell, however, what has come to be known as the “Liskov Substitution Principle” is essentially contained in the discussion of polymorphism in section 10.1 of in the first edition (Prentice Hall, 1988) of my book Object-Oriented Software Construction (hereafter OOSC1); for example, “the type compatibility rule implies that the dynamic type is always a descendant of the static type” (10.1.7) and “if B inherits from A, the set of objects that can be associated at run time with an entity [generalization of variable] includes instances of B and its descendants”.

Perhaps most tellingly, a key aspect of the substitution principle, as listed for example in the Wikipedia entry, is the rule on assertions: in a proper descendant, keep the invariant, keep or weaken the precondition, keep or strengthen the postcondition. This rule was introduced in OOSC1, over several pages in section 11.1. There is also an extensive discussion in the article Eiffel: Applying the Principles of Object-Oriented Design published in the Journal of Systems and Software, May 1986.

The original 1988 Liskov article cited (for example) in the Wikipedia entry on the substitution principle says nothing about this and does not in fact include any of the terms “assertion”, “precondition”, “postcondition” or “invariant”. To me this absence means that the article misses a key property of substitution: that the abstract semantics remain the same. (Also cited is a 1994 Liskov article in TOPLAS, but that was many years after OOSC1 and other articles explaining substitution and the assertion rules.)

Liskov’s original paper states that “if for each object o1 of type S there is an object o2 of type T such that for all programs P defined in terms of T, the behavior of P is unchanged when o1 is substituted for oz, then S is a subtype of T.” As stated, this property is impossible to satisfy: if the behavior is identical, then the implementations are the same, and the two types are identical (or differ only by name). Of course the concrete behaviors are different: applying the operation rotate to two different figures o1 and o2, whose types are subtypes of FIGURE and in some cases of each other, will trigger different algorithms — different behaviors. Only with assertions (contracts) does the substitution idea make sense: the abstract behavior, as characterized by preconditions, postconditions and the class invariants, is the same (modulo respective weakening and strengthening to preserve the flexibility of the different version). Realizing this was a major step in understanding inheritance and typing.

I do not know of any earlier (or contemporary) exposition of this principle and it would be normal to get the appropriate recognition.

Software design: design patterns

Two of the important patterns in the “Gang of Four” Design Patterns book (GoF) by Gamma et al. (1995) are the Command Pattern and the Bridge Pattern. I introduced them (under different names) in the following publications:

  • The command pattern appears in OOSC1 under the name “Undo-Redo” in section 12.2. The solution is essentially the same as in GoF. I do not know of any earlier exposition of the technique. See also notes [B] and [C].
  • The bridge pattern appears under the name “handle technique” in my book Reusable Software: The Base Component Libraries (Prentice Hall, 1994). It had been described several years earlier in manuals for Eiffel libraries. I do not know of an earlier reference. (The second edition of Object-Oriented Software Construction — Prentice Hall, 1997, “OOSC2” –, which also describes it, states that a similar technique is described in an article by Josef Gil and Ricardo Szmit at the TOOLS USA conference in the summer of 1994, i.e. after the publication of Reusable Software.)

Note that it is pointless to claim precedence over GoF since that book explicitly states that it is collecting known “best practices”, not introducing new ones. The relevant questions are: who, pre-GoF, introduced each of these techniques first; and which publications does the GoF cites as “prior art”  for each pattern. In the cases at hand, Command and Bridge, it does not cite OOSC1.

To be concrete: unless someone can point to an earlier reference, then anytime anyone anywhere using an interactive system enters a few “CTRL-Z” to undo commands, possibly followed by some “CTRL-Y” to redo them (or uses other UI conventions to achieve these goals), the software most likely relying on a technique that I first described in the place mentioned above.

Software design: Open-Closed Principle

Another contribution of OOSC1 (1988), section 2.3, reinforced in OOSC2 (1997) is the Open-Closed principle, which explained one of the key aspects of inheritance: the ability to keep a module both closed (immediately usable as is) and open to extension (through inheritance, preserving the basic semantics. I am mentioning this idea only in passing since in this case my contribution is usually recognized, for example in the Wikipedia entry.

Software design: OO for reuse

Reusability: the Case for Object-Oriented Design (1987) is, I believe, the first publication that clearly explained why object-oriented concepts were (and still are today — in Grady Booch’s words, “there is no other game in town”) the best answer to realize the goal of software construction from software components. In particular, the article:

  • Explains the relationship between abstract data types and OO programming, showing the former as the theoretical basis for the latter. (The CLU language at MIT originated from Liskov’s pioneering work on abstract data types, but was not OO in the full sense of the term, missing in particular a concept of inheritance.)
  • Shows that reusability implies bottom-up development. (Top-down refinement was the mantra at the time, and promoting bottom-up was quite a shock for many people.)
  • Explains the role of inheritance for reuse, as a complement to Parnas’s interface-based modular construction with information hiding.

Software design: Design by Contract

The contribution of Design by Contract is one that is widely acknowledged so I don’t have any point to establish here — I will just recall the essentials. The notion of assertion goes back to the work of Floyd, Hoare and Dijkstra in the sixties and seventies, and correctness-by-construction to Dijktra, Gries and Wirth, but Design by Contract is a comprehensive framework providing:

  • The use of assertions in an object-oriented context. (The notion of class invariant was mentioned in a paper by Tony Hoare published back in 1972.)
  • The connection of inheritance with assertions (as sketched above). That part as far as I know was entirely new.
  • A design methodology for quality software: the core of DbC.
  • Language constructs carefully seamed into the fabric of the language. (There were precedents there, but in the form of research languages such as Alphard, a paper design only, not implemented, and Euclid.)
  • A documentation methodology.
  • Support for testing.
  • Support for a consistent theory of exception handling (see next).

Design by Contract is sometimes taken to mean simply the addition of a few assertions here and there. What the term actually denotes is a comprehensive methodology with all the above components, tightly integrated into the programming language. Note in particular that preconditions and postconditions are not sufficient; in an OO context class invariants are essential.

Software design: exceptions

Prior to the Design by Contract work, exceptions were defined very vaguely, as something special you do outside of “normal” cases, but without defining “normal”. Design by Contract brings a proper perspective by defining these concepts precisely. This was explained in a 1987 article, Disciplined Exceptions ([86] in the list), rejected by ECOOP but circulated as a technical report; they appear again in detail in OOSC1 (sections 7.10.3 to 7.10.5).

Other important foundational work on exceptions, to which I know no real precursor (as usual I would be happy to correct any omission), addressed what happens to the outcome of an exception in a concurrent or distributed context. This work was done at ETH, in particular in the PhD theses  of B. Morandi and A. Kolesnichenko, co-supervised with S. Nanz. See the co-authored papers [345] and [363].

On the verification aspect of exceptions, see below.

Software design: refactoring

I have never seen a discussion of refactoring that refers to the detailed discussion of generalization in both of the books Reusable Software (1994, chapter 3) and Object Success (Prentice Hall, 1995, from page 122 to the end of chapter 6). These discussions describe in detail how, once a program has been shown to work, it should be subject to a posteriori design improvements. It presents several of the refactoring techniques (as they were called when the idea gained traction several years later), such as moving common elements up in the class hierarchy, and adding an abstract class as parent to concrete classes ex post facto.

These ideas are an integral part of the design methodology presented in these books (and again in OOSC2 a few later). It is beyond me why people would present refactoring (or its history, as in the Wikipedia entry on the topic) without referring to these publications, which were widely circulated and are available for anyone to inspect.

Software design: built-in documentation and Single-Product principle

Another original contribution was the idea of including documentation in the code itself and relying on tools to extract the documentation-only information (leaving implementation elements aside). The idea, described in detail in OOSC1 in 1988 (sections 9.4 and 9.5) and already mentioned in the earlier Eiffel papers, is that code should be self-complete, containing elements of various levels of abstraction; some of them describe implementation, but the higher-level elements describe specification, and are distinguished syntactically in such a way that tools can extract them to produce documentation at any desired level of abstraction.

The ideas were later applied through such mechanisms as JavaDoc (with no credit as far as I know). They were present in Eiffel from the start and the underlying principles, in particular the “Single Product principle” (sometimes “Self-Documentation principle”, and also generalized by J. Ostroff and R. Paige as “Single-Model principle”). Eiffel is the best realization of these principles thanks to:

  • Contracts (as mentioned above): the “contract view” of a class (called “short form” in earlier descriptions) removes the implementations but shows the relevant preconditions, postconditions and class invariants, given a precise and abstract specification of the class.
  • Eiffel syntax has a special place for “header comments”, which describe high-level properties and remain in the contract view.
  • Eiffel library class documentation has always been based on specifications automatically extracted from the actual text of the classes, guaranteeing adequacy of the documentation. Several formats are supported (including, from 1995 on, HTML, so that documentation can be automatically deployed on the Web).
  • Starting with the EiffelCase tool in the early 90s, and today with the Diagram Tool of EiffelStudio, class structures (inheritance and client relationships) are displayed graphically, again in an automatically extracted form, using either the BON or UML conventions.

One of the core benefits of the Single-Product principle is to guard against what some of my publications called the “Dorian Gray” syndrome: divergence of an implementation from its description, a critical problem in software because of the ease of modifying stuff. Having the documentation as an integral part of the code helps ensure that when information at some level of abstraction (specification, design, implementation) changes, the other levels will be updated as well.

Crucial in the approach is the “roundtripping” requirement: specifiers or implementers can make changes in any of the views, and have them reflected automatically in the other views. For example, you can graphically draw an arrow between two bubbles representing classes B and A in the Diagram Tool, and the code of B will be updated with “inherit A”; or you can add this Inheritance clause textually in the code of class B, and the diagram will be automatically updated with an arrow.

It is important to note how contrarian and subversive these ideas were at the time of their introduction (and still to some extent today). The wisdom was that you do requirements then design then implementation, and that code is a lowly product entirely separate from specification and documentation. Model-Driven Development perpetuates this idea (you are not supposed to modify the code, and if you do there is generally no easy way to propagate the change to the model.) Rehabilitating the code (a precursor idea to agile methods, see below) was a complete change of perspective.

I am aware of no precedent for this Single Product approach. The closest earlier ideas I can think of are in Knuth’s introduction of Literate Programming in the early eighties (with a book in 1984). As in the Single-product approach, documentation is interspersed with code. But the literate programming approach is (as presented) top-down, with English-like explanations progressively being extended with implementation elements. The Single Product approach emphasizes the primacy of code and, in terms of the design process, is very much yoyo, alternating top-down (from the specification to the implementation) and bottom-up (from the implementation to the abstraction) steps. In addition, a large part of the documentation, and often the most important one, is not informal English but formal assertions. I knew about Literate Programming, of course, and learned from it, but Single-Product is something else.

Software design: from patterns to components

Karine Arnout’s thesis at ETH Zurich, resulting in two co-authored articles ([255] and [257], showed that contrary to conventional wisdom a good proportion of the classical design patterns, including some of the most sophisticated, can be transformed into reusable components (indeed part of an Eiffel library). The agent mechanism (see below) was instrumental in achieving that result.

Programming, design and specification concepts: abstract data types

Liskov’s and Zilles’s ground-breaking 1974 abstract data types paper presented the concepts without a mathematical specification, using programming language constructs instead. A 1976 paper (number [3] in my publication list, La Description des Structures de Données, i.e. the description of data structures) was as far as I know one of the first to present a mathematical formalism, as  used today in presentations of ADTs. John Guttag was taking a similar approach in his PhD thesis at about the same time, and went further in providing a sound mathematical foundation, introducing in particular (in a 1978 paper with Jim Horning) the notion of sufficient completeness, to which I devoted a full article in this blog  (Are My Requirements Complete?) about a year ago. My own article was published in a not very well known journal and in French, so I don’t think it had much direct influence. (My later books reused some of the material.)

The three-level description approach of that article (later presented in English for an ACM workshop in the US in 1981, Pingree Park, reference [28]) is not well known but still applicable, and would be useful to avoid frequent confusions between ADT specifications and more explicit descriptions.

When I wrote my 1976 paper, I was not aware of Guttag’s ongoing work (only of the Liskov and Zilles paper), so the use of a mathematical framework with functions and predicates on them was devised independently. (I remember being quite happy when I saw what the axioms should be for a queue.) Guttag and I both gave talks at a workshop organized by the French programming language interest group in 1977 and it was fun to see that our presentations were almost identical. I think my paper still reads well today (well, if you read French). Whether or not it exerted direct influence, I am proud that it independently introduced the modern way of thinking of abstract data types as characterized by mathematical functions and their formal (predicate calculus) properties.

Language mechanisms: genericity with inheritance

Every once in a while I get to referee a paper that starts “Generics, as introduced in Java…” Well, let’s get some perspective here. Eiffel from its introduction in 1985 combined genericity and inheritance. Initially, C++ users and designers claimed that genericity was not needed in an OO context and the language did not have it; then they introduced template. Initially, the designers of Java claimed (around 1995) that genericity was not needed, and the language did not have it; a few years later Java got generics. Initially, the designers of C# (around 1999) claimed that genericity was not needed, and the language did not have it; a few years later C# and .NET got generics.

Genericity existed before Eiffel of course; what was new was the combination with inheritance. I had been influenced by work on generic modules by a French researcher, Didier Bert, which I believe influenced the design of Ada as well; Ada was the language that brought genericity to a much broader audience than the somewhat confidential languages that had such a mechanism before. But Ada was not object-oriented (it only had modules, not classes). I was passionate about object-oriented programming (at a time when it was generally considered, by the few people who had heard of it as an esoteric, academic pursuit). I started — in the context of an advanced course I was teaching at UC Santa Barbara — an investigation of how the two mechanisms relate to each other. The results were a paper at the first OOPSLA in 1986, Genericity versus Inheritance, and the design of the Eiffel type system, with a class mechanism, inheritance (single and multiple), and genericity, carefully crafted to complement each other.

With the exception of a Trellis-Owl, a  design from Digital Equipment Corporation also presented at the same OOPSLA (which never gained significant usage), there were no other OO languages with both mechanisms for several years after the Genericity versus Inheritance paper and the implementation of genericity with inheritance in Eiffel available from 1986 on. Eiffel also introduced, as far as I know, the concept of constrained genericity, the second basic mechanism for combining genericity with inheritance, described in Eiffel: The Language (Prentice Hall, 1992, section 10.8) and discussed again in OOSC2 (section 16.4 and throughout). Similar mechanisms are present in many languages today.

It was not always so. I distinctly remember people bringing their friends to our booth at some conference in the early nineties, for the sole purpose of having a good laugh with them at our poster advertising genericity with inheritance. (“What is this thing they have and no one else does? Generi-sissy-tee? Hahaha.”). A few years later, proponents of Java were pontificating that no serious language needs generics.

It is undoubtedly part of of the cycle of invention (there is a Schopenhauer citation on this, actually the only thing from Schopenhauer’s philosophy that I ever understood [D]) that people at some point will laugh at you; if it did brighten their day, why would the inventor deny them one of the little pleasures of life? But in terms of who laughs last, along the way C++ got templates, Java got generics, C# finally did too, and nowadays all typed OO languages have something of the sort.

Language mechanisms: multiple inheritance

Some readers will probably have been told that multiple inheritance is a bad thing, and hence will not count it as a contribution, but if done properly it provides a major abstraction mechanism, useful in many circumstances. Eiffel showed how to do multiple inheritance right by clearly distinguishing between features (operations) and their names, defining a class as a finite mapping between names and features, and using renaming to resolve any name clashes.

Multiple inheritance was made possible by an implementation innovation: discovering a technique (widely imitated since, including in single-inheritance contexts) to implement dynamic binding in constant time. It was universally believed at the time that multiple inheritance had a strong impact on performance, because dynamic binding implied a run-time traversal of the class inheritance structure, already bad enough for single inheritance where the structure is a tree, but prohibitive with multiple inheritance for which it is a directed acyclic graph. From its very first implementation in 1986 Eiffel used what is today known as a virtual table technique which guarantees constant-time execution of routine (method) calls with dynamic binding.

Language mechanisms: safe GC through strong static typing

Simula 67 implementations did not have automatic garbage collection, and neither had implementations of C++. The official excuse in the C++ case was methodological: C programmers are used to exerting manual control of memory usage. But the real reason was a technical impossibility resulting from the design of the language: compatibility with C precludes the provision of a good GC.

More precisely, of a sound and complete GC. A GC is sound if it will only reclaim unreachable objects; it is complete if it will reclaim all unreachable objects. With a C-based language supporting casts (e.g. between integers and pointers) and pointer arithmetic, it is impossible to achieve soundness if we aim at a reasonable level of completeness: a pointer can masquerade as an integer, only to be cast back into a pointer later on, but in the meantime the garbage collector, not recognizing it as a pointer, may have wrongly reclaimed the corresponding object. Catastrophe.

It is only possible in such a language to have a conservative GC, meaning that it renounces completeness. A conservative GC will treat as a pointer any integer whose value could possibly be a pointer (because it lies between the bounds of the program’s data addresses in memory). Then, out of precaution, the GC will refrain from reclaiming the objects at these addresses even if they appear unreachable.

This approach makes the GC sound but it is only a heuristics, and it inevitably loses completeness: every once in a while it will fail to reclaim some dead (unreachable) objects around. The result is a program with memory leaks — usually unacceptable in practice, particularly for long-running or continuously running programs where the leaks inexorably accumulate until the program starts thrashing then runs out of memory.

Smalltalk, like Lisp, made garbage collection possible, but was not a typed language and missed on the performance benefits of treating simple values like integers as a non-OO language would. Although in this case I do not at the moment have a specific bibliographic reference, I believe that it is in the context of Eiffel that the close connection between strong static typing (avoiding mechanisms such as casts and pointer arithmetic) and the possibility of sound and complete garbage collection was first clearly explained. Explained in particular around 1990 in a meeting with some of the future designers of Java, which uses a similar approach, also taken over later on by C#.

By the way, no one will laugh at you today for considering garbage collection as a kind of basic human right for programmers, but for a long time the very idea was quite sulfurous, and advocating it subjected you to a lot of scorn. Here is an extract of the review I got when I submitted the first Eiffel paper to IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering:

Systems that do automatic garbage collection and prevent the designer from doing his own memory management are not good systems for industrial-strength software engineering.

Famous last words. Another gem from another reviewer of the same paper:

I think time will show that inheritance (section 1.5.3) is a terrible idea.

Wow! I wish the anonymous reviewers would tell us what they think today. Needless to say, the paper was summarily rejected. (It later appeared in the Journal of Systems and Software — as [82] in the publication list — thanks to the enlightened views of Robert Glass, the founding editor.)

Language mechanisms: void safety

Void safety is a property of a language design that guarantees the absence of the plague of null pointer dereferencing.

The original idea came (as far as I know) from work at Microsoft Research that led to the design of a research language called C-omega; the techniques were not transferred to a full-fledged programming language. Benefiting from the existence of this proof of concept, the Eiffel design was reworked to guarantee void safety, starting from my 2005 ECOOP keynote paper (Attached Types) and reaching full type safety a few years later. This property of the language was mechanically proved in a 2016 ETH thesis by A. Kogtenkov.

Today all significant Eiffel development produces void-safe code. As far as I know this was a first among production programming languages and Eiffel remains the only production language to provide a guarantee of full void-safety.

This mechanism, carefully crafted (hint: the difficult part is initialization), is among those of which I am proudest, because in the rest of the programming world null pointer dereferencing is a major plague, threatening at any moment to crash the execution of any program that uses pointers of references. For Eiffel users it is gone.

Language mechanisms: agents/delegates/lambdas

For a long time, OO programming languages did not have a mechanism for defining objects wrapping individual operations. Eiffel’s agent facility was the first such mechanism or among the very first together the roughly contemporaneous but initially much more limited delegates of C#. The 1999 paper From calls to agents (with P. Dubois, M. Howard, M. Schweitzer and E. Stapf, [196] in the list) was as far as I know the first description of such a construct in the scientific literature.

Language mechanisms: concurrency

The 1993 Communications of the ACM paper on Systematic Concurrent Object-Oriented Programming [136] was certainly not the first concurrency proposal for OO programming (there had been pioneering work reported in particular in the 1987 book edited by Tokoro and Yonezawa), but it innovated in offering a completely data-race-free model, still a rarity today (think for example of the multi-threading mechanisms of dominant OO languages).

SCOOP, as it came to be called, was implemented a few years later and is today a standard part of Eiffel.

Language mechanisms: selective exports

Information hiding, as introduced by Parnas in his two seminal 1972 articles, distinguishes between public and secret features of a module. The first OO programming language, Simula 67, had only these two possibilities for classes and so did Ada for modules.

In building libraries of reusable components I realized early on that we need a more fine-grained mechanism. For example if class LINKED_LIST uses an auxiliary class LINKABLE to represent individual cells of a linked list (each with a value field and a “right” field containing a reference to another LINKABLE), the features of LINKABLE (such as the operation to reattach the “right” field) should not be secret, since LINKED_LIST needs them; but they should also not be generally public, since we do not want arbitrary client objects to mess around with the internal structure of the list. They should be exported selectively to LINKED_LIST only. The Eiffel syntax is simple: declare these operations in a clause of the class labeled “feature {LINKED_LIST}”.

This mechanism, known as selective exports, was introduced around 1989 (it is specified in full in Eiffel: The Language, from 1992, but was in the Eiffel manuals earlier). I think it predated the C++ “friends” mechanism which serves a similar purpose (maybe someone with knowledge of the history of C++ has the exact date). Selective exports are more general than the friends facility and similar ones in other OO languages: specifying a class as a friend means it has access to all your internals. This solution is too coarse-grained. Eiffel’s selective exports make it possible to define the specific export rights of individual operations (including attributes/fields) individually.

Language mechanisms and implementation: serialization and schema evolution

I did not invent serialization. As a student at Stanford in 1974 I had the privilege, at the AI lab, of using SAIL (Stanford Artificial Intelligence Language). SAIL was not object-oriented but included many innovative ideas; it was far ahead of its time, especially in terms of the integration of the language with (what was not yet called) its IDE. One feature of SAIL with which one could fall in love at first sight was the possibility of selecting an object and having its full dependent data structure (the entire subgraph of the object graph reached by following references from the object, recursively) stored into a file, for retrieval at the next section. After that, I never wanted again to live without such a facility, but no other language and environment had it.

Serialization was almost the first thing we implemented for Eiffel: the ability to write object.store (file) to have the entire structure from object stored into file, and the corresponding retrieval operation. OOSC1 (section 15.5) presents these mechanisms. Simula and (I think) C++ did not have anything of the sort; I am not sure about Smalltalk. Later on, of course, serialization mechanisms became a frequent component of OO environments.

Eiffel remained innovative by tackling the difficult problems: what happens when you try to retrieve an object structure and some classes have changed? Only with a coherent theoretical framework as provided in Eiffel by Design by Contract can one devise a meaningful solution. The problem and our solutions are described in detail in OOSC2 (the whole of chapter 31, particularly the section entitled “Schema evolution”). Further advances were made by Marco Piccioni in his PhD thesis at ETH and published in joint papers with him and M. Oriol, particularly [352].

Language mechanisms and implementation: safe GC through strong static typing

Simula 67 (if I remember right) did not have automatic garbage collection, and neither had C++ implementations. The official justification in the case of C++ was methodological: C programmers are used to exerting manual control of memory usage. But the real obstacle was technical: compatibility with C makes it impossible to have a good GC. More precisely, to have a sound and complete GC. A GC is sound if it will only reclaim unreachable objects; it is complete if it will reclaim all unreachable objects. With a C-based language supporting casts (e.g. between integers and pointers) and pointer arithmetic, it is impossible to achieve soundness if we aim at a reasonable level of completeness: a pointer can masquerade as an integer, only to be cast back into a pointer later on, but in the meantime the garbage collector, not recognizing it as a pointer, may have wrongly reclaimed the corresponding object. Catastrophe. It is only possible in such a language to have a conservative GC, which will treat as a pointer any integer whose value could possibly be a pointer (because its value lies between the bounds of the program’s data addresses in memory). Then, out of precaution, it will not reclaim the objects at the corresponding address. This approach makes the GC sound but it is only a heuristics, and it may be over-conservative at times, wrongly leaving dead (i.e. unreachable) objects around. The result is, inevitably, a program with memory leaks — usually unacceptable in practice.

Smalltalk, like Lisp, made garbage collection possible, but was not a typed language and missed on the performance benefits of treating simple values like integers as a non-OO language would. Although in this case I do not at the moment have a specific bibliographic reference, I believe that it is in the context of Eiffel that the close connection between strong static typing (avoiding mechanisms such as casts and pointer arithmetic) and the possibility of sound and complete garbage collection was first clearly explained. Explained in particular to some of the future designers of Java, which uses a similar approach, also taken over later on by C#.

By the way, no one will laugh at you today for considering garbage collection as a kind of basic human right for programmers, but for a long time it was quite sulfurous. Here is an extract of the review I got when I submitted the first Eiffel paper to IEEE <em>Transactions on Software Engineering:

Software engineering: primacy of code

Agile methods are widely and properly lauded for emphasizing the central role of code, against designs and other non-executable artifacts. By reading the agile literature you might be forgiven for believing that no one brought up that point before.

Object Success (1995) makes the argument very clearly. For example, chapter 3, page 43:

Code is to our industry what bread is to a baker and books to a writer. But with the waterfall code only appears late in the process; for a manager this is an unacceptable risk factor. Anyone with practical experience in software development knows how many things can go wrong once you get down to code: a brilliant design idea whose implementation turns out to require tens of megabytes of space or minutes of response time; beautiful bubbles and arrows that cannot be implemented; an operating system update, crucial to the project which comes five weeks late; an obscure bug that takes ages to be fixed. Unless you start coding early in the process, you will not be able to control your project.

Such discourse was subversive at the time; the wisdom in software engineering was that you need to specify and design a system to death before you even start coding (otherwise you are just a messy “hacker” in the sense this word had at the time). No one else in respectable software engineering circles was, as far as I know, pushing for putting code at the center, the way the above extract does.

Several years later, agile authors started making similar arguments, but I don’t know why they never referenced this earlier exposition, which still today I find not too bad. (Maybe they decided it was more effective to have a foil, the scorned Waterfall, and to claim that everyone else before was downplaying the importance of code, but that was not in fact everyone.)

Just to be clear, Agile brought many important ideas that my publications did not anticipate; but this particular one I did.

Software engineering: the roles of managers

Extreme Programming and Scrum have brought new light on the role of managers in software development. Their contributions have been important and influential, but here too they were for a significant part prefigured by a long discussion, altogether two chapters, in Object Success (1995).

To realize this, it is enough to read the titles of some of the sections in those chapters, describing roles for managers (some universal, some for a technical manager): “risk manager”, “interface with the rest of the world” (very scrummy!), “protector of the team’s sanity”, “method enforcer” (think Scrum Master), “mentor and critic”. Again, as far as I know, these were original thoughts at the time; the software engineering literature for the most part did not talk about these issues.

Software engineering: outsourcing

As far as I know the 2006 paper Offshore Development: The Unspoken Revolution in Software Engineering was the first to draw attention, in the software engineering community, to the peculiar software engineering challenges of distributed and outsourced development.

Software engineering: automatic testing

The AutoTest project (with many publications, involving I. Ciupa, A. Leitner, Y. Wei, M. Oriol, Y. Pei, M. Nordio and others) was not the first to generate tests automatically by creating numerous instances of objects and calling applicable operations (it was preceded by Korat at MIT), but it was the first one to apply this concept with Design by Contract mechanisms (without which it is of little practical value, since one must still produce test oracles manually) and the first to be integrated in a production environment (EiffelStudio).

Software engineering: make-less system building

One of the very first decisions in the design of Eiffel was to get rid of Make files.

Feldman’s Make had of course been a great innovation. Before Make, programmers had to produce executable systems manually by executing sequences of commands to compile and link the various source components. Make enabled them to instead  to define dependencies between components in a declarative way, resulting in a partial order, and then performed a topological sort to produce the sequence of comments. But preparing the list of dependencies remains a tedious task, particularly error-prone for large systems.

I decided right away in the design of Eiffel that we would never force programmers to write such dependencies: they would be automatically extracted from the code, through an exhaustive analysis of the dependencies between modules. This idea was present from the very the first Eiffel report in 1985 (reference [55] in the publication list): Eiffel programmers never need to write a Make file or equivalent (other than for non-Eiffel code, e.g. C or C++, that they want to integrate); they just click a Compile button and the compiler figures out the steps.

Behind this approach was a detailed theoretical analysis of possible relations between modules in software development (in many programming languages), published as the “Software Knowledge Base” at ICSE in 1985. That analysis was also quite instructive and I would like to return to this work and expand it.

Educational techniques: objects first

Towards an Object-Oriented Curriculum ( TOOLS conference, August 1993, see also the shorter JOOP paper in May of the same year) makes a carefully argued case for what was later called the Objects First approach to teaching programming. I would be interested to know if there are earlier publications advocating starting programming education with an OO language.

The article also advocated for the “inverted curriculum”, a term borrowed from work by Bernie Cohen about teaching electrical engineering. It was the first transposition of this concept to software education. In the article’s approach, students are given program components to use, then little by little discover how they are made. This technique met with some skepticism and resistance since the standard approach was to start from the very basics (write trivial programs), then move up. Today, of course, many introductory programming courses similarly provide students from day one with a full-fledged set of components enabling them to produce significant programs.

More recent articles on similar topics, taking advantage of actual teaching experience, are The Outside-In Method of Teaching Programming (2003) and The Inverted Curriculum in Practice (at ICSE 2006, with Michela Pedroni). The culmination of that experience is the textbook Touch of Class from 2009.

Educational techniques: Distributed Software Projects

I believe our team at ETH Zurich (including among others M. Nordio, J. Tschannen, P. Kolb and C. Estler and in collaboration with C. Ghezzi, E. Di Nitto and G. Tamburrelli at Politecnico di Milano, N. Aguirre at Rio Cuarto and many others in various universities) was the first to devise,  practice and document on a large scale (see publications and other details here) the idea of an educational software project conducted in common by student groups from different universities. It yielded a wealth of information on distributed software development and educational issues.

Educational techniques: Web-based programming exercises

There are today a number of cloud-based environments supporting the teaching of programming by enabling students to compile and test their programs on the Web, benefiting from a prepared environment (so that they don’t have to download any tools or prepare control files) and providing feedback. One of the first — I am not sure about absolute precedence — and still a leading one, used by many universities and applicable to many programming languages, is Codeboard.

The main developer, in my chair at ETH Zurich, was Christian Estler, supported in particular by M. Nordio and M. Piccioni, so I am only claiming a supporting role here.

Educational techniques: key CS/SE concepts

The 2001 paper Software Engineering in the Academy did a good job, I think, of defining the essential concepts to teach in a proper curriculum (part of what Jeannette Wing’s 2006 paper called Computational Thinking).

Program verification: agents (delegates etc.)

Reasoning about Function Objects (ICSE 2010, with M. Nordio, P. Müller and J. Tschannen) introduced verification techniques for objects representing functions (such as agents, delegates etc., see above) in an OO language. Not sure whether there were any such techniques before.

Specification languages: Z

The Z specification language has been widely used for formal development, particularly in the UK. It is the design of J-R Abrial. I may point out that I was a coauthor of the first publication on Z in English (1980),  describing a version that preceded the adaptation to a more graphical-style notation done later at Oxford. The first ever published description of Z, pertaining to an even earlier version, was in French, in my book Méthodes de Programmation (with C. Baudoin), Eyrolles, 1978, running over 15 pages (526-541), with the precise description of a refinement process.

Program verification: exceptions

Largely coming out of the PhD thesis of Martin Nordio, A Sound and Complete Program Logic for Eiffel (TOOLS 2009) introduces rules for dealing with exceptions in a Hoare-style verification framework.

Program verification: full library, and AutoProof

Nadia Polikarpova’s thesis at ETH, aided by the work of Carlo Furia and Julian Tschannen (they were the major contributors and my participation was less important), was as far as I know the first to produce a full functional verification of an actual production-quality reusable library. The library is EiffelBase 2, covering fundamental data structures.

AutoProof — available today, as a still experimental tool, through its Web interface, see here — relied on the AutoProof prover, built by the same team, and itself based on Microsoft Research’s Boogie and Z3 engines.

More

There are more concepts worthy of being included here, but for today I will stop here.

Notes

[A] One point of divergence between usual presentations of the substitution principle and the view in OOSC and my other publications is the covariance versus contravariance of routine argument types. It reflects a difference of views as to what the proper policy (both mathematically sound and practically usable) should be.

[B]  The GoF book does not cite OOSC for the command or bridge patterns. For the command pattern it cites (thanks to Adam Kosmaczewski for digging up the GoF text!) a 1985 SIGGRAPH paper by Henry Lieberman (There’s More to Menu Systems than Meets the Screen). Lieberman’s paper describes the notion of command object and mentions undoing in passing, but does not include the key elements of the command pattern (as explained in full in OOSC1), i.e. an abstract (deferred) command class with deferred procedures called (say) do_it and undo_it, then specific classes for each kind of command, each providing a specific implementation of those procedures, then a history list of commands supporting multiple-level undo and redo as explained in OOSC1. (Reading Lieberman’s paper with a 2021 perspective shows that it came tantalizingly close to the command pattern, but doesn’t get to it. The paper does talk about inheritance between command classes, but only to “define new commands as extensions to old commands”, not in the sense of a general template that can be implemented in many specific ways. And it does mention a list of objects kept around to enable recovery from accidental deletions, and states that the application can control its length, as is the case with a history list; but the objects in the list are not command objects, they are graphical and other objects that have been deleted.)

[C] Additional note on the command pattern: I vaguely remember seeing something similar to the OOSC1 technique in an article from a supplementary volume of the OOPSLA proceedings in the late eighties or early nineties, i.e. at the same time or slightly later, possibly from authors from Xerox PARC, but I have lost the reference.

[D] Correction: I just checked the source and learned that the actual Schopenhauer quote (as opposed to the one that is usually quoted) is different; it does not include the part about laughing. So much for my attempts at understanding philosophy.

 

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Le français dans le monde

Extrait d’un article dans Le Monde d’hier, signé Juliette Bénézit (sur un problème sérieux : l’inadéquation des services en ligne pour les cartes de séjour pour étrangers) : il s’agit d’une

problématique particulièrement prégnante en Ile-de-France

Diable ! Quels termes galants pour dire que le problème est particulièrement aigu dans cette belle région !

En général — heuristique personnelle mais qui marche assez bien — je cesse généralement d’écouter dès que j’entends “problématique” pour problème et “thématique” pour thème. Quant à “prégnant”, voici la définition du Larousse :

Littéraire. Qui s’impose à l’esprit, qui produit une forte impression.
Qui s’impose fortement, en parlant d’une structure perceptive et dans le contexte de la Gestalttheorie.

Re-diable ! Ou plutôt, Verdammt ! Gestalttheorie !

Je recherchais la référence exacte de l’article pour mettre ci-dessus le lien correct ; tenez-vous bien : Google donne cent pages Web contenant le texte exact “problématique particulièrement prégnante”. Dans Le Monde et ailleurs. (J’ai aussi cherché, pensant à une plaisanterie un peu trop ressassée en anglais, “à-demi prégnante”, mais là rien.)

Je pourrais continuer la liste des atrocités prétentieuses, mais excusez-moi, j’ai une problématique très très prégnante à régler.

 

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Time to resurrect PSP?

Let us assume for the sake of the argument that software quality matters. There are many ingredients to software quality, of which one must be the care that every programmer devotes to the job. The Personal Software Process, developed by Watts Humphrey in the 1990s [1], prescribes a discipline that software developers should apply to produce good software and improve their professional ability over their careers. It has enjoyed moderate success but was never a mass movement and rarely gets mentioned nowadays; few software developers, in my experience, even know the name. Those who do often think of it as passé, a touching memory from the era of Monica Lewinsky and the Roseanne show.

Once cleaned of a few obsolete elements, PSP deserves to be known and applied.

PSP came out of Watts Humphrey’s earlier work on the Capability Maturity Model (see my earlier article on this blog, What is wrong with CMMI), a collection of recommended practices and assessment criteria for software processes, originally developed in the mid-eighties for the U.S. military contractor community but soon thereafter embraced by software outsourcing companies (initially, Indian ones) and later by other industries. Responding to complaints that CMM/CMMI, focused on processes in large companies, ignored the needs of smaller ones, and lacked individual guidance for developers, Humphrey developed TSP, the Team Software Process, and PSP.

The most visible part of PSP is a six-step process pictured in the middle of this diagram:
cmmi

The most visible and also the most corny. Who today wants to promise always to follow such a strict sequence of steps? Always to write the code for a module in full before compiling it? (Notice there is no backward arrow, the process is sequential.) Always to test at the end only? Come on. This is the third decade of the 21st century.

Today we compile as we code, using the development environment (IDE) as a brilliant tool to check everything we do or plan to do. For my part, whenever I am writing code and have not compiled my current draft for more than a few minutes I start feeling like an addict in need of a fix; my fix is the Compile button of EiffelStudio. At some eventual stage the compiler becomes a tool to generate excutable code, but long before that it has been my friend, coach, mentor, and doppelgänger, helping me get things (types, null references, inheritance…) right and gently chiding me when I wander off the rails.

As to tests, even if you do not buy into the full dogma of Test-Driven Development (I don’t), they get written and exercised right from the start, as you are writing the code, not afterwards. Compile all the time, test all the time.

It’s not just that a process such as the above ignores the contributions of agile methods, which are largely posterior to PSP. As analyzed in [2], agile is a curious mix of good ideas and a few horrendous ones. But among its durable contributions is the realization that development must be incremental, not a strict succession of separate activities.

This old-style flavor or PSP is probably the reason why it has fallen out of favor. But (like the agile rejection of upfront lifecycle activities) such a reaction is a case of criticism gone too far, ignoring the truly beneficial contributions. Ignore PSP’s outmoded sequence of activities and you will find that PSP’s core message is as relevant today as it ever was. That message is: we should learn from the practices of traditional engineers and apply a strict professional discipline. For example:

  • Keep a log of all activities. (See “Logs” in the above figure.) Engineers are taught to record everything they do; many programmers don’t bother. This practice, however, is essential to self-improvement.
  • Keep measurements of everything you do. (There are lots of things to measure, from hours spent on every kind of task to bugs found, time to fix them etc.)
  • Estimate and plan your work.
  • Clearly define commitments, and meet them.
  • Resist pressure to make unreasonable commitments (something that agilists approach also emphasize).
  • Understand your current performance.
  • Understand your programming style and how it affects various measures. (As an example, code size, as a function of the number of routines, depends on whether you are more concise or more verbose in style).
  • Continually improve your expertise as a professional.

PSP does not limit itself to such exhortations but gives concrete tools to apply the principles, with a view to: measuring, tracking and analyzing your work; learning from your performance variations; and incorporating the lessons learned into your professional practices. On the topic of measurement, for example, PSP includes precise guidelines on what to measure and how to measure it, and how to rely on proxies for quantities that are hard to assess directly. On this last point, PSP includes PROBE (PROxy-Based Estimating, you cannot have a method coming out of the world of US government organizations without cringeworthy acronyms), a general framework for estimating size and resource parameters from directly measurable proxies.

This is what PSP is about: a discipline of personal productivity and growth, emphasizing personal discipline, tracking and constant improvement. It is not hard to learn; a technical report by Humphrey available online [3] provides a sufficient basis to understand the concepts and start a process of self-improvement.

Watts Humphrey himself, as all who had the privilege to meet him can testify, was a model of seriousness and professionalism, the quintessential engineer. (I also remember him as the author of what may be the best pun I ever heard — ask me sometime.) PSP directly reflects these qualities and — ignoring its visible but in the end unimportant remnants from outdated technical choices — should be part of every software engineering curriculum and every software engineer’s collection of fundamental practices.

References

[1] Watts Humphrey, Introduction to the Personal Software Process, Addison-Wesley, 1996.

[2] Bertrand Meyer: Agile! The Good, the Hype and the Ugly, Springer, 2014, see here.

[3] Watts Humphrey, The Personal Software Process, Software Engineering Institute Technical Report CMU/SEI-2000-TR-022, available (in PDF, free) here.

 

Recycled A version of this article was first published in the Communications of the ACM blog.

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Between you and me

I have been conducting interesting conversations with a two-something child who has not quite mastered the speaker-dependent [1] personal pronouns. He says things like “Where is your mom?”, when he actually means to ask about his mother, not mine; from hearing people tell him things like “your mom is coming”, he is clearly taking “your mom” as some kind of paraphrase for “mom”. He approaches people and says “I want to help me”, obviously from having heard, from others, “would you come and help me?”.

I am not concerned about young Tim (let us call him that), who sooner or later will get the point. But let us assume that someone, call him Tom, is determined to explain to Tim the concepts of “you” and “me”. Not so easy! In fact, come to think of it, fairly tricky, treacherous even. We all learned the concept at some point; I wish I remembered how it happened for me [2].

The difficulty is that someone, whether Tom or a third party, has to provide the explanation, a circumstance that messes up the explanation itself since it contains speaker-dependent terms. (Did I hear the word “Heisenberg”? If so I will ignore it.) Tom might try something like the following explanation — let us call it /A/  — but it will not work:

If Tom says me it means Tom, but if Tim says me it means Tim.

If Tim says you it means Tom, but if Tom says you it means Tim.

The reason it does not work is lack of quoting, but before I get to this let me mention that a mathematical model is not hard to come by. From a two-element set Names = {Tim, Tom} to itself, there are four total functions. Of these, two are constant functions. The other two are non-constant; one, me, is the identity function on Names, and you is the other. They are the functions me = {<Tim, Tim>, <Tom, Tom>} and you = {<Tim, Tom>, <Tom, Tim>}. I is just a synonym for me (the accusative in the latter being one of the few remnants of declension in English.)

Let us call this explanation /B/.  It can be illustrated as follows:

 

subjectivity

We can also write these functions (using for conciseness [c: A \ d: B … \ Z] for the conditional expression if c then A elseif d then Belse Z end) as the following version /C/:

me = λ n | [n = Tim: Tim \ Tom]

you = λ n | [n = Tim: Tom \ Tim]

In practice, however, this modeling of the concepts “you” and “me” as functions in Names → Names is not sufficient to define them properly, for example to turn the informal explanation /A/ into one that makes sense. The problem is that we are dealing with a larger set of words than just Names: the set   Words = {Tim, Tom, Me, You} with four elements. The meaning of a sentence that may include any of them is not absolute, but depends on who is uttering the sentence. When I say “me” and you say “me” the meaning is different, although when I say “you” and you say “me” the meaning is the same.

To interpret a sentence, then, we need a second-level function: a function meaning not in Words → Words but in Names → Words → Names, defined as follows:

meaning = λ n  |  λ w  |     [w ∈ Names: w    \    w = Me: me (n)    \    you (n)]

Let us call this definition /D/. Examples of its application include:

  • meaning (Tim) (Tom) = Tom. (First case: no speaker-dependency).
  • meaning (Tim) (Me) = Tim. (Second case, expresses the part of /A/ that said “if Tim says me it means Tim”.)
  • meaning (Tim) (You) = Tom. (Third case, expresses the part of /A/ that said “if Tim says you it means Tom”.)

/D/ is the most accurate definition of speaker-dependent pronouns and I may try it with the real Tim at the next opportunity (as soon as I have taught him lambda calculus).

/D/ also helps us understand what does not quite work in /A/, the first and perhaps most intuitive attempt. With explanations such as  “if Tim says you it means Tom” we are actually trying to express the need for making meanings speaker-dependent, that is to say, explain that the evaluation of a sentence must take into account who utters it. But this attempt fails because we need a general rule which will apply to all sentences, and the explanation itself is a sentence. To evaluate the sentence “if Tim says you it means Tom” we need to evaluate “you” which figures in it; that evaluation would yield either Tim or Tom depending on who is speaking. But because the sentence is itself part a definition of “you”, we do not want in this case to evaluate “you”.

We could write you in straight quotes as in programming languages:

if Tim says “you” it means Tom

but that is not the form of quoting we need. In a programming language, “you” is a character string, made of the characters ‘y‘, ‘o‘ and ‘u‘ in that order. Here, the makeup of this string in terms of its characters is completely irrelevant. The form of quoting that we need must achieve something else: preventing, in the evaluation of a formula, the evaluation of one of its parts.

John McCarthy’s Lisp language, coming out as early as 1959, showed how to handle this issue correctly. (This contribution is one of many from Lisp, including garbage collection and the notion of functional programming — not bad for a single language. See my 2011 obituary of John McCarthy on this blog [3].) One of the reasons Lisp needed a quoting mechanism is that it was designed to be self-describing and specifically self-evaluating, a spectacularly new concept at the time. McCarthy’s original book on Lisp (LISP 1.5 Programmer’s Manual, MIT Press, 1962) contains a dazzling interpreter of Lisp, written in Lisp and taking up no more than half a page. The interpreter is based on eval, a function (in the sense of a Lisp function, defined by a Lisp expression) which evaluates any Lisp program. You cannot define eval unless you have some way to prevent evaluation of part of an expression.

The convention is simple. For any expression x we may define another expression x — which we can read aloud as “QUOTED x”. Then:

  • Evaluating x yields the value of x.
  • Evaluating x yields x.

The original Lisp notation was (QUOTE x), which clearly conveys the idea: QUOTE is a function — in Lisp, function application f (x) is written (f x) — whose value, when applied to an argument, is that argument. (Not the value of the argument: the argument itself.)

With such a quote notation, explanations in the style of /A/ can be made meaningful; for example (version /E/):

If Tom says ‘me it means Tom, but if Tim says ‘me it means Tim.

This should be said with the quote spoken out loud: QUOTED me”.

We’ll see if Tim sees what /E/ means. At least, you see what you mean. I mean, I see what I  mean. Sorry, I meant that I see what you mean. Oh well. We see what we mean.

 

Notes and references

[1] I really want to call them “subjective personal pronouns”, in the ordinary sense of “subjective” opposed to “objective” as in “a subjective assessment”, but in grammatical terminology “subjective pronoun” has a well-accepted but entirely different meaning, that of a pronoun used as the subject of a sentence, like “she” rather than “her”. Hence “speaker-dependent pronoun”. Linguists also use the term “indexical pronouns”, as in the reference cited in note [2].

[2] Linguists investigating language learning have studied the matter. A recent article (2015) is 2-Year-Olds’ Comprehension of Personal Pronouns by M. Moyer, K. Harrigan, V. Hacquard and J. Lidz (in Supplement to the proceedings of the 39th Boston University Conference on Language Development, eds E. Grillo, K. Jepson and M. LaMendola), available here. The article includes a literature review. It acknowledges the you-and-me problem (first- and second-person pronouns) although it suggests that third-person pronouns (“he”, “she”) may be even more of a challenge to infants. Two quotes (with bibliographic references removed):

  • The evidence from previous studies examining two year olds’ competence is mixed, with some studies finding children succeeding with pronouns as early as 22-24 months, others finding success much later, and some with children succeeding at a range of ages.
  • Most [studies] suggest a production/comprehension asymmetry… Production studies suggest that children begin producing pronouns around 15-18 months, starting with first person, then second person, and finally third person pronouns. These early productions typically include some errors where the child reverses first and second person, but on the whole consistent errors are few . On the other hand, comprehension data focusing on speech addressed to the child suggest that children first understand second person pronouns, then first person, and finally third person.

[3] My article on John McCarthy can be found here.

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The extremely bizarre idea of an inauguration

Could someone please explain what there is to celebrate when a candidate is elected to a political function? The grotesque ideas of a victory rally or an inauguration ceremony defy common sense.

An election success is an opportunity to start doing something good. It is not an achievement; it is the promise of possible achievements to come. Someone should hand the successful candidate the key to his office and wish him good luck. His supporters should go home and start thinking of how best to help him. He should get to work. End of that part of the story. There is by definition nothing to celebrate.

The time to hold a celebration, if any, is when a politician completes her term. At that stage there exists a clear basis for one of two outcomes: either a shameful, stealthy, miserable exit in the frosty predawn fog of a deserted airfield (as happened on Wednesday at Andrews); or a lavish, joyful party to extol and relish the brilliant successes of the last few years. Then, but only then, does a celebration makes sense.

Out with inaugurations, in with outaugurations!

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The right forms of expression

If you want to know whether your_string has at least one upper-case character, you will write this in Eiffel:

if  ∃ c: your_string ¦ c.is_upper then

Such predicate-calculus boolean expressions, using a quantifier (“for all”) or (“there exists”) are becoming common in Eiffel code. They are particularly useful in Design by Contract assertions, making it possible to characterize deep semantic properties of the code and its data structures. For example a class invariant clause in a class I wrote recently states

from_lists_exist: ∀ tf: triples_from ¦ tf Void                        — [1]

meaning that all the elements, if any, of the list triples_from  are non-void (non-null). The notation is the exact one from mathematics. (Mathematical notation sometimes uses a dot in place of the bar, but the bar is clearer, particularly in an OO context where the dot has another use.)

Programming languages should support time-honored notations from mathematics. Reaching this goal has been a driving force in the evolution of Eiffel, but not as a concession to “featurism” (the gratuitous piling up of language feature upon feature). The language must remain simple and consistent; any new feature must find its logical place in the overall edifice.

The design of programming languages is a constant search for the right balance between rigor, simplicity, consistency, formal understanding, preservation of existing code, innovation and expressiveness. The design of Eiffel has understood the last of these criteria as implying support for established notations from mathematics, not through feature accumulation but by re-interpreting these notations in terms of the language’s fundamental concepts. A typical example is the re-interpretation of the standard mathematical notation a + b as as simply an operator-based form for the object-oriented call a.plus (b), obtained by declaring “+” as an operator alias for the function plus in the relevant classes. There are many more such cases in today’s Eiffel. Quantifier expressions using and  are the latest example.

 They are not a one-of-a-kind trick but just as a different syntax form for loops. Expressed in a more verbose form, the only one previously available, [1] would be:

across triples_from is tf all tf /= Void end                         — [2]

It is interesting to walk back the history further. [2] is itself a simplification of

across triples_from as tf all tf.item /= Void end               — [3]

where the “.item” has a good reason for being there, but that reason is irrelevant to a beginner. The earlier use of as in [3] is also the reason for the seemingly bizarre use of is in [2], which is only explainable by the backward compatibility criterion (code exists that uses as , which has a slightly different semantics from is), and will go away. But a few years ago the across loop variant did not exist and you would have had to write the above boolean expressions as

all_non_void (triples_from)

after defining a function

all_non_void (l: LIST [T]): BOOLEAN                                    — [4]
                         — Are all the elements of `l’, if any, non-void?
          local
pos: INTEGER
do
from
pos := l.index
l.start
Result := True
until not Result or l.after loop
l.forth
end
go_ith (pos)
end

The road traveled from [4] to [1] is staggering. As we introduced new notations in the history of Eiffel the reaction of the user community has sometimes been between cautious and negative. With the exception of a couple of quickly discarded ideas (such as the infamous and short-lived “!!” for creation), they were generally adopted widely because they simplify people’s life without adding undue complexity to the language. The key has been to avoid featurism and choose instead to provide two kinds of innovation:

  • Major conceptual additions, which elevate the level of abstraction of the language. A typical introduction was the introduction of agents, which provide the full power of functional programming in an object-oriented context; another was the SCOOP concurrency mechanism. There have been only a few such extensions, all essential.
  • Syntactical variants for existing concepts, allowing more concise forms obtained from traditional mathematical notation. The use of quantifier expressions as in [1] is the latest example.

Complaints of featurism still occasionally happen when people first encounter the new facilities, but they fade away quickly as people start using them. After writing a few expressions such as [1], no one wants to go back to any of the other forms.

These quantifier expressions using and , as well as the “” not-equal sign for what used to be (and still commonly is) written “/=”, rely on Unicode. Eiffel started out when ASCII was the law of the land. (Or 8-bit extended ASCII, which does not help much since the extensions are rendered differently in different locales, i.e. the same 8-bit character code may mean something different on French and Swedish texts.) In recent years, Eiffel has made a quiet transition to full Unicode support. (Such support extends to manifest strings and operators, not to identifiers. The decision, which could be revisited, has been to keep the ASCII-only  policy for identifiers to favor compatible use by programmers regardless of their mother tongues.) The use of Unicode considerably extends the expressive power of the language, in particular for scientific software which can — thanks to Eiffel’s mechanism for defining free operators — rely on advanced mathematical notations.

Unicode is great, but I hear the question: how in the world can we enter the corresponding symbols, since our keyboards are still ASCII plus some extensions?

It would be tedious to have to select from a list of special symbols (as you do when inserting a mathematical symbol in Microsoft Word or, for that matter, as I did when inserting the phrase “ and ” in the preceding paragraph using WordPress).

The answer lies in the interplay between the language and the development environment. EiffelStudio, like other modern IDEs, includes an automatic completion mechanism which lets you enter the beginning of a construct and will take care of filling in the rest. Already useful for complex structures (if you type “if” the tools will create the entire “if then else end” conditional structure for you to fill in), automatic completion will take care of inserting the appropriate Unicode symbols for you. Type for example “across”,  then CTRL-Space to trigger completion, and the choices will include the “∀” and “” forms. You can see below how this works:

across_all

Programming languages can be at the same time simple, easy to learn, consistent, and expressive. Start using quantifiers now!

Acknowledgments to the Ecma Technical Committee on Eiffel and the Eiffel Software team, particularly Alexander Kogtenkov (see his blog post here) and (for the completion mechanism and its animated illustration above) Jocelyn Fiat.

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Questionnaire on deployed, formally verified systems

A group of us is preparing a survey on systems that have been both formally verified and deployed for actual use. To make sure we do not forget any important development, we have devised a questionnaire. If you have experience with such a system, please help by filling the questionnaire. It only includes a few questions and takes a few minutes to fill. You can find it here.

Please also bring it to the attention of others who might have relevant information.

Thanks in advance!

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New video lecture: distances, invariants and recursion

I have started a new series of video lectures, which I call “Meyer’s Object-Oriented Classes” (MOOC). The goal is to share insights I have gained over the years on various aspects of programming and software engineering. Many presentations are focused on one area, such as coding, design, analysis, theoretical computer science (even there you find a division between “Theory A”, i.e. complexity, Turing machines and the like, and “Theory B”, i.e. semantics, type theory etc.), software project management, concurrency… I have an interest in all and try to explain connections.

 

The first lecture describes the edit distance (Levenshtein) algorithm, explains its correctness by introducing the loop invariant, expands on that notion, then shows a recursive version, explores the connection with the original version (it’s the invariant), and probes further into another view of recursive computations, leading to the concept of dynamic programming.

The videos are on YouTube and can be accessed from bertrandmeyer.com/levenshtein. (The general page for all lectures is at bertrandmeyer.com/mooc.)

The lecture is recorded in four segments of about 15 minutes each. In the future I will limit myself to 8-10 minutes. In fact I may record this lecture again; for example it would be better if I had a live audience rather than talking to my screen, and in general the recording is somewhat low-tech, but circumstances command. Also, I will correct a few hiccups (at some point in the recording I notice a typo on a slide and fix it on the fly), but the content will remain the same.

Feedback is of course welcome. I hope to record about a lecture a week from now on.

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Fan mail

Received this today from a heretofore unknown correspondent (I don’t often check Facebook Messenger but just happened to). Name removed (I am not sure he would want me to identify him), text translated from another language into English.

Hello, thanks for your book “Object-Oriented Software Construction” [read in a translation]. I read it after a horrible failure of a project on which I was a consultant. Another consultant was my technical leader. He was truly insufferable but I appreciated him for one reason: his code! I had never seen such “beautiful” program code; he was using principles of genericity, dynamic binding and others, which were totally unknown to me after the lousy programming education I had received. He had insulted me, telling me that I was no developer at all; I was deeply offended since I could feel that he was right. In spite of his unbearable personality I wanted to learn at his side, but he was far too selfish, seeing me just as a competitor, even if a pathetic one. He had a book on the side of his desk… and it’s that book that enabled me to understand where he had learned all those OO design methods. That book, obviously, was yours, and I acquired a copy for myself. I sincerely think that it should be used as textbook in educational institutions. And I really wanted to thank you for writing it. I hope to become a real developer thanks to you. So, thank you.

Note 1: Thanks to you.

Note 2: There is also the intro programming text, Touch of Class (Amazon page).

Note 3 (to my fan club): You are welcome to take advantage of the ideas and there is actually no compelling requirement to be, in addition, “insufferable”.

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Why we love computers and software

A 1949 book I just bought* has the following printer’s label, hand-glued on the title page:

printer_note

Because of a change in pagination, you will need to add the digit 9 [actually, the number, not the digit] to references to page numbers between 1 and 114, and the digit 8 to those between 116 and the end of the volume.

Examples: The reference that says “see page 92” should be read as “see page 101”
The reference that says “ see page 150” should be read as “see page 158”

*Précis d’histoire de la langue et du vocabulaire français (handbook of the history of French language and vocabulary) by Albert Dauzat, Larousse, Paris, 1949.

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L’appel du 19 juin

Vous souvenez-vous de ce discours ?

Françaises, Français, mes chers compatriotes,

Je voulais vous parler hier mais on m’a dit que l’expression  “appel du 18 juin” était déjà prise et j’ai décidé d’attendre jusqu’aujourd’hui, 19 juin 2020. Un jour ne devrait pas faire une grande différence.

Mon message à toutes et à tous est simple :

Ne partez pas en vacances cette année.

Je sais, c’est dur. Pour les Français, les vacances sont sacrées depuis 1936. Toute l’année vous parlez essentiellement des dernières et des prochaines vacances. Mais cette fois-ci ce n’est vraiment pas le moment. Même si vous ne partez pas à l’étranger, avec la meilleure volonté du monde vous allez quand même vous entasser sur les plages et dans les hôtels. Vous essayerez le masque mais il suffit de se promener dans la rue pour voir combien sont au-dessous du nez ou au-dessus de la bouche ou les deux, ne servant strictement à rien.

Si nous partons comme tous les ans, imaginez la situation qui s’ensuivra inéluctablement. Projetez-vous quelques mois en avant ; le 28 octobre, pour choisir une date au hasard. Êtes-vous prêts pour 35 000 cas et 240 décès par jour, en croissance sans fin prévisible ? Pour un retour de l’engorgement des hôpitaux ? Pour — j’hésite à prononcer le mot honni ! — un nouveau reconfinement, celui que nous avions promis d’éviter mais qui serait devenu inévitable ? Et tout ce qui en découle — faillites, licenciements, séparations ? Sans même mentionner des fêtes de fin d’année sinistres sans la moindre lumière au bout du tunnel.

Non, j’en suis sûr, tout cela est impensable et n’est pas ce que vous voulez.

Alors, sacrifiez vos vacances cette année pour ne pas avoir à sacrifier bien plus les mois et les années qui suivront. Restez chez vous. Économisez votre argent, ne serait-ce que pour vous offrir d’excellentes vacances l’année prochaine. Lisez des livres, regardez des films, faites votre gymnastique, mais évitez déplacements et rencontres. Arrêtons-nous pour mieux rebondir ensuite. Si vous travaillez dans le tourisme, la passe sera difficile, et l’État vous aidera, mais céder à la facilité ne ferait que rendre vos perspectives pires encore.

En ces derniers jours de printemps, où tout semble vous sourire, vous n’en avez peut-être pas entièrement conscience encore, mais bientôt la bise sera venue : ne risquez pas, pour le bref plaisir d’un bel été, un automne et un hiver pires que ce que notre époque a jamais connu.

Pas de départ en vacances à l’été 2020.

Pour ma part, je ne m’en souviens pas.

D’autant plus qu’il n’a jamais été prononcé.

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Things to do to an algorithm

What can you do to or with an algorithm? In other words, what is a good verb to substitute for the hyphen in   “— the algorithm”?

You can learn an algorithm. Discovering classical algorithms is a large part of the Bildungsroman of a computer scientist. Sorting algorithms, graph algorithms, parsing algorithms, numerical algorithms, matrix algorithms, graphical algorithms…

You can teach an algorithm. Whether a professor or just a team leader, you explain to others why the obvious solution is not always the right one. As when  I saw that someone had implemented the traversal part of a garbage collection scheme (the “mark” of mark-and-sweep) using a recursive algorithm. Recursion is a great tool, but not here: it needs a stack of unpredictable size, and garbage collection, which you trigger when you run out of space, is not precisely the moment to start wildly allocating memory. In comes the Deutsch-Schorr-Waite algorithm, which improbably (as if tightrope-walking) subverts the structure itself to find its way forth and back.

To teach it, you can dance an algorithm. Sounds strange, but Informatics Europe gave its 2013 education award to the “AlgoRhythmics” group from at Sapientia University in Romania, which  demonstrates algorithms using central-European dances; see their rendering of Merge Sort:

(Their page has more examples. I see that recently they expanded to other kinds of dance and will let you discover binary search as flamenco and backtracking as classical ballet.) More generally you can simulate or animate an algorithm.

You can admire an algorithm. Many indeed are a source of wonder. The inner beauty of topological sort, Levenshtein or AVL can leave no one indifferent.

You can improve an algorithm. At least you can try.

You can invent an algorithm. Small or large, ambitious or mundane, but not imagined yet by anyone. Devising a new algorithm is a sort of rite of passage in our profession. If it does prove elegant, useful and elegant, you’ll get a real kick (trust me). Then you can publish the algorithm.

You can prove an algorithm, that is to say, mathematically establish its correctness. It is indeed increasingly unreasonable to publish an algorithm without correctness arguments. Maybe I have an excuse here to advertize for an an article that examines important algorithms across a wide variety of fields and showcases their main claim to correctness: their loop invariants.

You can implement an algorithm. That is much of what we do in software engineering, even if as an OO guy I would immediately add “as part of the associated data structure.

Of late, algorithms have come to be associated with yet another verb; one that I would definitely not have envisioned when first learning about algorithms in Knuth (the book) and from Knuth (the man who most certainly does not use foul language).

You can fuck an algorithm.

Thousands of British students marched recently to that slogan:

They were demonstrating against a formula (the Guardian gives the details) that decided on university admissions. The starting point for these events was a ministerial decision to select students not from their grades at exams (“A-level”), which could not take place because of Covid, but instead from their assessed performance in their schools. So far so good but the authorities decided to calibrate these results with parameters deduced from each school’s past performance. Your grade is no longer your grade: if Jill and Joan both got a B, but Jill’s school has been better at getting students into (say) Oxford in the past, then Jill’s B is worth more than Joan’s B.

The outcry was easy to predict, or should have been for a more savvy government. Students want to be judged by their own performance, not by the results of some other students they do not even know. Arguments that the sole concern was a legimitate one (an effort to compensate for possible grade inflation in some schools) ceased to be credible when it came out that on average the algorithm boosted grades from private schools by 4.7. No theoretical justification was going to be of much comfort anyway to the many students who had been admitted to the universities of their dreams on the basis of their raw grades, and after the adjustment found themselves rejected.

In the end, “Fuck the Algorithm!” worked. The government withdrew the whole scheme; it tried to lay the blame for the fiasco on the regulatory authority (Ofqual), fooling no one.

These U.K. events of August 2020 will mark a turning point in the relationship between computer science and society. Not for the revelation that our technical choices have human consequences; that is old news, even if we often pretend to ignore it. Not for the use of Information Technology as an excuse; it is as old (“Sorry, the computer does not allow that!”) as IT itself. What “Fuck the Algorithm!” highlights is the massive danger of the current rush to apply machine learning to everything.

As long as we are talking marketing campaigns (“customers who bought the product you just ordered also bought …”) or image recognition, the admiring mood remains appropriate. But now, ever more often, machine learning (usually presented as “Artificial Intelligence” to sound more impressive) gets applied to decisions affecting human lives. In the US, for example, machine-learning algorithms increasingly help judges make decisions, or make the decisions themselves. Following this slippery path is crazy and unethical. It is also dangerous, as the U.K. students’ reaction indicates.

Machine learning does what the name indicates: it reproduces and generalizes the dominant behaviors of the past. The algorithms have no notion of right and wrong; they just learn. When they affect societal issues, the potential for societal disaster is everywhere.

Amid all the enthusiasm generated by the elegant techniques invented by machine-learning pioneers over the last two decades, one barely encounters any serious reservation. Codes of ethics (from ACM and others) have little to contribute.

We should be careful, though. Either we get our act together and define exacting controls on the use of machine learning for matters affecting people’s fates, or we will see a massive rejection of algorithmic technology, the right parts along with the wrong ones.

The British students of the year 2020’s weird summer will not be the last ones to tell us to fuck the algorithm.

This article was first published in the Communications of the ACM blog.Recycled

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A novel concept for success in science

No one seems until now [1] to have identified a key element of any scientific article being submitted or revised for publication. It is guaranteed to increase, if not the quality of your articles, at least their chances of publication, which after all is what counts.

We are told to include a “related work” section, but just as important is the unrelated work section. For example:

Unrelated work

The following publications have no attested  relevance to the topic of this paper but, as pointed out by an anonymous reviewer [2], they are breathtakingly brilliant: [Meyer 1997], [Meyer 2005], [Meyer et al. 2009], [Al et Meyer 2011]. In addition, having taken a look at the composition of the Editorial Board,  we would like to point out the pioneering results introduced by [Meyer 2017] and [Meyer 2019].

This insight is shared with the sole selfless purpose of helping the community, particularly young and aspiring researchers.

Notes

[1] I did find a 2018 Twitter thread started by Arvind Narayanan, with the insightful (if dejected) observation that “`related work’ sections exclusively cite unrelated work”.

[2] Example only, for the sake of an example, since for my part I actually refuse to be an anonymous reviewer; I always sign my reviews, so if I want to tell the authors “I think you should cite my such-and-such paper here” I can do so without any qualms.

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New master program at SIT: Webinar tomorrow

The Schaffhausen Institute of Technology (SIT) is holding a Webinar tomorrow with a set of three talks by: Serguei Beloussov, founder of Acronis and president of SIT; Michael Widenius, CTO of MariaDB and creator of MySQL Server; and Mauro Pezzè, my colleague at SIT, who will present the new master program that we have just announced, combining CS/SE topics with management and marketing courses to train future technology leaders.

The talks are in the form of a Webinar, starting at 9 AM this Tuesday (9 June). You can find all the details on the corresponding SIT page at here.

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PhD and postdoc positions in verification in Switzerland

My group, the Chair of Software Engineering, at the newly created Schaffhausen Institute of Technology has open positions for both PhD students and postdocs. We are looking for candidates with a passion for reliable software and a mix of theoretical knowledge and practical experience in software engineering. Candidates should have degrees in computer science or related fields: a doctorate for postdoc positions, a master’s degree for PhD positions. Postdoc candidates should have a substantial publication record. Experience in one or more of the following fields is a plus:

  • Software verification (axiomatic, model-checking, abstract interpretation etc.).
  • Advanced techniques of software testing.
  • Formal methods, semantics of programming languages, type theory.
  • Design by Contract, Eiffel, techniques of correctness-by-construction.
  • Cybersecurity.

 Compensation at both levels is attractive. The PhD program is conducted in cooperation with partner universities. 

 Interested candidates should send a CV and relevant documents or links to bm@sit.org. They are also welcome to contact me for details.

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Which one is better? Please answer this poll

I recently read the autobiography [1] of the great mathematician André Weil and came across the following comment (slightly abridged):

 

Any mathematician worthy of the name has known such states of lucid exaltation, when ideas magically fall into place. Poincaré, in a famous passage, described how he experienced such a moment when he discovered fuchsian functions. Of these states, Gauss reportedly said procreare jucundum (to procreate is a pleasure), while adding: sed parturire molestum (but giving birth is a pain). Unlike sexual pleasure, this one can last hours or even days. Whoever has experienced it wants to renew it, but is impotent to provoke it, except at best through obstinate work, of which it then appears as the reward.

 

This penetrating observation (if I may use the expression) brings a new perspective to the 18th-century French song famously revived by Joan Baez:

 

“The joy of love lasts but an instant”, it says,  “the pain of love lasts a lifetime” (plaisir d’amour ne dure qu’un moment, chagrin d’amour dure toute la vie). Clearly, the second part of the verse contains an error: “chagrin d’amour” (the pain of love) must have been a transcription mistake for “comprendre la démonstration par Paul Cohen de l’indépendance de l’hypothèse du continu” (understanding Paul Cohen’s proof of the independence of the continuum hypothesis, which unlike most pains of love does take a lifetime, or two). It is not hard how the confusion could have arisen, as both sound French.

Still, Weil’s observation, if true, is worrying. As everyone can witness almost daily, mathematical ability in humankind is progressing by leaps and bounds. Does this trend portend bad news (echoes of Tolstoi’s Kreutzer Sonata) for our collective reproductive future?

A grave question indeed. To help address it, I have started a scientific poll, which you will find here. The question it asks is of the utmost importance: do you prefer sex or math? To preserve the integrity of the study, please note that by answering the poll you are declaring that you have engaged in both sex and math, although not necessarily at the same time.

As soon as I get the research grant for which I have applied, I will submit the results to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Reference

[1] André Weil, Souvenirs d’Apprentissage, Birkhäuser, Boston, 1991. English translation: The Apprenticeship of a Mathematician, Springer, 1992.

 

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The fool wants nothing

Another completely unexpected gem from the Viaje de Turquia (see the previous article on this blog): a 16-th century statement of the Dunning-Kruger effect!

An effect, of course, which has never been more visible than today (just watch the news).

Against Pedro, who narrates his travels and travails, the dialog sets two other characters, friends from his youth. They serve both as foils for Pedro, enabling his cleverness to shine — they are themselves not the brightest candles on the cake —, and as the embodiment of conventional wisdom. He occasionally gets really impatient with them, although always friendly, and at some point cites this ditty that he remembers from his youth in Spain:

 

Blind people want to see,

The deaf man wants to hear,

The fat man wants to slim,

The lame man wants to run.

For the fool there is no remedy:

Since he fancies that he knows,

He does not care to learn more.

Wow!

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A retort that we could use

At this gloomy moment it is good to find a gem in an unexpected place.

I am reading (in translation) the Viaje de Turquia, or Turkish Voyage — literaly, Voyage of Turkey — a 16th-century epic dialog, whose authorship is disputed. It is a precious source of information on the period and rings throughout like a true story. The hero, Pedro, tells of his time as a prisoner of war of the Turks and the ignominies he had to suffer for years. He is a doctor, if a self-taught one, and has cured many members of the Pasha’s entourage, but at some point the Pasha, out of spite, sends him back to the harshest form of manual labor. One of his former patients, rich and high-ranked, spots him, the intellectual struggling to move heavy materials in the dirt and under the whip, and mocks him:

Hey, all the philosophy of Aristotle and Plato, all the medical science of Galen, all the eloquence of Cicero and Demosthenes, how have they helped you?

To which Pedro, having put his sack on his shoulder and wiped the tears caused by this pique, answers, looking him straight in the eye:

They have helped me live through days like this one.

Pretty good, I thought. Not just the sense of repartee, but the sentiment itself (echoing by the comments of many a mistreated intellectual in later ages including ours).

Not only that, but it worked, at least for a while. So astounded was the persecutor by the retort, that he took Pedro’s sack to carry it himself, and convinced the Pasha to relieve Pedro from hard work and give him money.

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How to protect from the coronavirus

In the current state of the pandemic and for many more months until a vaccine is found, there is exactly one way to fight the coronavirus, protecting yourself and protecting others.

It is not a mask.

It is two masks. You wear a mask, I wear a mask.

Many people still believe that they can only get the virus if an infected person coughs or sneezes on them. This is a tragic myth. Droplets are carried by breath in conversation, by food particles from someone eating near you, or simply by air flowing your way.

Anyone today who goes out without wearing a mask is irresponsible (or suicidal, but that is not an excuse, since he harms others too). Your mask is not enough, though. I must wear one too.

Then we are safe from each other. Remember: we do not have definitive figures, but at least one carrier in five is asymptomatic.

Everything else (and I am not even considering quack solutions and unproven treatments) is pointless. Disinfectant (or better soap) helps, but as a complement. Gloves help medical professionals, who know how to use them properly, but for the general public they can do more harm than good: look at people in shops, once they have gloves they touch everything, moving the virus everywhere. Testing will be critical, of course, but here is another sobering statistics: while there are no false positives (if you test positive, you are infected), around 20% of negative tests are wrong (people have the virus, and it is not detected).

I know: in many places, including some the most technologically advanced nations on earth, there are no masks to be found. This may be the greatest scandal of the modern era. But in the meantime makeshift masks are an acceptable palliative. There are guides all over the web as to how to make them, and if nothing else is available a tightly bound scarf or equivalent, cleaned thoroughly and regularly, will do.

Wear a mask and tell others to do the same.

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Free tutoring for children

kidtutorsWe’re a group of cousins aged 8-14 who” got “the idea to help others, since we know we are not alone”. They are providing mostly free tutoring to other kids. Details here.

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