Archive for the ‘Conference’ Category.

LASER summer school on software for robotics: last call for registration

Much of the progress in robotics is due to software advances, and software issues remain at the heart of the formidable challenges that remain. The 2017 LASER summer school, held in September in Elba, brings together some of the most prestigious international experts in the area.

The LASER school has established itself as one of the principal forums to discussed advanced software issues. The 2017 school takes place from 9 to 17 September in the idyllic setting of the Hotel del Golfo in Procchio, Elba Island, Italy.

Robotics is progressing at an amazing pace, bringing improvements to almost areas of human activity. Today’s robotics systems rely ever more fundamentally on complex software, raising difficult issues. The LASER 2017 summer school covers both the current state of robotics software technology and open problems. The lecturers are top international experts with both theoretical contributions and major practical achievements in developing robotics systems.
The LASER school is intended for professionals from the industry (engineers and managers) as well as university researchers, including PhD students. Participants learn about the most important software technology advances from the pioneers in the field. The school’s focus is applied, although theory is welcome to establish solid foundations. The format of the school favors extensive interaction between participants and speakers.

We have lined up an impressive roster of speakers from the leading edge of both industry and academia:

Rodolphe Gélin, Aldebaran Robotics
Ashish Kapoor, Microsoft Research
Davide Brugali, University of Bergamo, on Managing software variability in robotic control systems
Nenad Medvidovic, University of Southern California, on Software Architectures of Robotics Systems
Bertrand Meyer, Politecnico di Milano & Innopolis University, on Concurrent Object-Oriented Robotics Software
Issa Nesnas, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, on Experiences from robotic software development for research and planetary flight robots
Hiroshi (“Gitchang”) Okuno, Waseda University & Kyoto University, on Open-Sourced Robot Audition Software HARK: Capabilities and Applications

The school takes place at the magnificent Hotel del Golfo in the Gulf of Procchio, Elba. Along with an intensive scientific program, participants will have time to enjoy the countless natural and cultural riches of this wonderful, history-laden jewel of the Mediterranean.

For more information about the school, the speakers and registration see the LASER site.

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AutoProof workshop: Verification As a Matter of Course

The AutoProof technology pursues the goal of “Verification As a Matter Of Course”, integrated into the EVE development environment. (The AutoProof  project page here; see particularly the online interactive tutorial.) A one-day workshop devoted to the existing AutoProof and current development will take place on October 1 near Toulouse in France. It is an informal event (no proceedings planned at this point, although based on the submissions we might decide to produce a volume), on a small scale, designed to bring together people interested in making the idea of practical verification a reality.

The keynote will be given by Rustan Leino from Microsoft Research, the principal author of the Boogie framework on which the current implementation of AutoProof relies.

For submissions (or to attend without submitting) see the workshop page here. You are also welcome to contact me for more information.

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Harlan Mills award 2015: nominations sought

The IEEE’s Harlan Mills award is the principal prize in software engineering. The 2014 recipients are Patrick and Radhia Cousot, recognized for their groundbreaking work on abstract interpretation; Patrick will receive the award at ICSME 2014 on Oct. 1st. The list of previous recipients is here.

I have the privilege of serving as the current committee chair; the deadline for nomination is October 15. Please nominate your favorite software engineering grandee! You can find more information and the nomination form here.

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Crossing the Is and doting on the Ts

 

Last week at the the CSEE&T conference in Klagenfurt (the conference page is here, I gave a keynote), a panel discussed how universities should prepare students for software engineering. Barry Boehm, one of the panelists, stated the following principle, which afterwards he said he had learned from Simon Ramo, co-founder of TRW. In hiring people, he stated, it is better to avoid candidates with an I-shaped profile: narrowly specialized in one topic that they have explored to exhaustion. Better look for a T: someone who has mastered an area in depth and then branched out to learn about many others.

I started playing with the variants. One should avoid the hyphens, or em-dashes, ““: people with a smattering of everything but no detailed knowledge of anything. Boehm said that this is the reason he always argued against establishing such undergraduate majors as systems engineering. A variant of the hyphen is the overline ““: graduates who supposedly are so smart that they can learn anything, but whose actual knowledge is limited to abstract notions.

Along with the T we should consider the “bottom” symbol of denotational semantics: . It corresponds to people who have a broad educational base, for example in mathematics, and have deepened it by focusing on a particular topic. The T and can be combined into an H turned on its side, H on the side: acquiring a solid foundation, specializing, then using that experience to become familiar with new areas.

Extending the permutation group, I am not sure what a “+” profile would be, but in a discussion last night Rustan Leino and Peter Müller suggested the “O”, ability to to circle around topics, and the umlaut, knowing a thing or two; in fact, exactly two.

 

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New article: passive processors

 

The SCOOP concurrency model has a clear division of objects into “regions”, improving the clarity and reliability of concurrent programs by establishing a close correspondence between the object structure and the process structure. Each region has an associated “processor”, which executes operations on the region’s objects. A literal application of this rule implies, however, a severe performance penalty. As part of the work for his PhD thesis (defended two weeks ago), Benjamin Morandi found out that a mechanism for specifying certain processors as “passive” yields a considerable performance improvement. The paper, to be published at COORDINATION, describes the technique and its applications.

Reference

Benjamin Morandi, Sebastian Nanz and Bertrand Meyer: Safe and Efficient Data Sharing for Message-Passing Concurrency, to appear in proceedings of COORDINATION 2014, 16th International Conference on Coordination Models and Languages, Berlin, 3-6 June 2014, draft available here.
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LASER 2014 (Elba, September)

2014 marks the 10-th anniversary (11th edition) of the LASER summer school. The school will be held September 7-14, 2014, and the detailed information is here.

LASER (the name means Laboratory for Applied Software Engineering Research) is dedicated to practical software engineering. The roster of speakers since we started is a who’s who of innovators in the field. Some of the flavor of the school can gathered from the three proceedings volumes published in Springer LNCS (more on the way) or simply by browsing the pages of the schools from previous years.

Usually we have a theme, but to mark this anniversary we decided to go for speakers first; we do have a title, “Leading-Edge Software Engineering”, but broad enough to encompass a wide variety of a broad range of topics presented by star speakers: Harald Gall, Daniel Jackson, Michael Jackson, Erik Meijer (appearing at LASER for the third time!), Gail Murphy and Moshe Vardi. With such a cast you can expect to learn something important regardless of your own primary specialty.

LASER is unique in its setting: a 5-star hotel in the island paradise of Elba, with outstanding food and countless opportunities for exploring the marvelous land, the beaches, the sea, the geology (since antiquity Elba has been famous for its stones and minerals) and the history, from the Romans to Napoleon, who in the 9 months of his reign changed the island forever. The school is serious stuff (8:30 to 13 and 17 to 20 every day), but with enough time to enjoy the surroundings.

Registration is open now.

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Niklaus Wirth birthday symposium, 20 February, Zurich

In honor of Niklaus Wirth’s 80-th birthday we are organizing a symposium at ETH on February 20, 2014. This is a full-day event with invited talks by:

  • Vint Cerf
  • Hans Eberlé
  • Michael Franz
  • me
  • Carroll Morgan
  • Martin Odersky
  • Clemens Szyperski
  • Niklaus Wirth himself

From the symposium’s web page:

Niklaus Wirth was a Professor of Computer Science at ETH Zürich, Switzerland, from 1968 to 1999. His principal areas of contribution were programming languages and methodology, software engineering, and design of personal workstations. He designed the programming languages Algol W, Pascal, Modula-2, and Oberon, was involved in the methodologies of structured programming and stepwise refinement, and designed and built the workstations Lilith and Ceres. He published several text books for courses on programming, algorithms and data structures, and logical design of digital circuits. He has received various prizes and honorary doctorates, including the Turing Award, the IEEE Computer Pioneer, and the Award for outstanding contributions to Computer Science Education.

Participation is free (including breaks, lunch and the concluding “Apéro”) but space is strictly limited and we expect to run out of seats quickly. So if you are interested (but only if you are certain to attend) please register right away.

Symposium page and access to registration form: here.

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Informatics education in Europe: Just the facts

 

In 2005 a number of us started Informatics Europe [1], the association of university departments and industrial research labs in computer science in Europe. The association has now grown to 80 members across the entire continent; it organizes the annual European Computer Science Summit and has published a number of influential reports. The last one just came out: Informatics Education in Europe: Institutions, Degrees, Students, Positions, Salaries — Key Data 2008-2012 [2]. The principal author is Cristina Pereira, who collected and organized the relevant data over more than a year; I helped with the preparation of the final text.

At the beginning of Informatics Europe we considered with particular attention  the model of the Computing Research Association [3], which played a crucial role in giving computer science (informatics) its due place in the US academic landscape. Several past and current officers of the CRA,  such as Willy Zwaenepoel, Ed Lazowska, Bob Constable, Andy Bernat, Jeannette Wing, Moshe Vardi and J Strother Moore gave keynotes at our early conferences and we of course asked them for the secrets of their organization’s success. One answer that struck us was the central role played by data collection. Just gathering the  facts, such as degrees and salaries, established for the first time a solid basis for serious discussions. We took this advice to heart and the report is the first result.

Gathering the information is particularly difficult for Europe given the national variations and the absence of centralized statistical data. Even the list of names under which institutions teach informatics in Europe fills a large table in the report. Cristina’s decision was, from the start, to favor quality over quantity: to focus on impeccable data for countries for which we could get it, rather than trying to cover the whole continent with data of variable credibility.

The result is the first systematic repository of basic information on informatics education in Europe: institutions, degrees offered and numbers awarded, student numbers, position titles and definitions, and (a section which will not please everyone) salaries for PhD students, postdocs and professors of various ranks.

The report is a first step; it only makes sense if we can regularly continue to update it and particularly extend it to other countries. But even in its current form (and with the obvious observation that my opinion is not neutral)  I see it as a major step forward for the discipline in Europe. We need an impeccable factual basis to convince the public at large and political decision-makers to give informatics the place it deserves in today’s educational systems.

References

[1] Informatics Europe site, see here.

[2] Cristina Pereira and Bertrand Meyer: Informatics Education in Europe: Institutions, Degrees, Students, Positions, Salaries — Key Data 2008-2012, Informatics Europe report, 30 September 2013, available here.

[3] Computing Research Association (US), see here.

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Reading notes: misclassified bugs

 

(Please note the general disclaimer [1].)

How Misclassification Impacts Bug Prediction [2], an article to be presented on Thursday at ICSE, is the archetype of today’s successful empirical software engineering research, deriving significant results from the mining of publicly available software project repositories — in this case Tomcat5 and three others from Apache, as well as Rhino from Mozilla. The results are in some sense meta-results, because many studies have already mined the bug records of such repositories to draw general lessons about bugs in software development; what Herzig, Just and Zeller now tell us is that the mined data is highly questionable: many problems classified as bugs are not bugs.

The most striking results (announced in a style a bit stentorian to my taste, but indeed striking) are that: every third bug report does not describe a bug, but a request for a new feature, an improvement, better documentation or tests, code cleanup or refactoring; and that out of five program files marked as defective, two do not in fact contain any bug.

These are both false positive results. The repositories signal very few misclassifications the other way: only a small subset of enhancement and improvement requests (around 5%) should have been classified as bugs, and even fewer faulty files are missed (8%, but in fact less than 1% if one excludes an outlier, tomcat5 with 38%, a discrepancy that the paper does not discuss).

The authors have a field day, in the light of this analysis, of questioning the validity of the many studies in recent years — including some, courageously cited, by Zeller himself and coauthors — that start from bug repositories to derive general lessons about bugs and their properties.

The methodology is interesting if a bit scary. The authors (actually, just the two non-tenured authors, probably just a coincidence) analyzed 7401 issue reports manually; more precisely, one of them analyzed all of them and the second one took a second look at the reports that came out from the first step as misclassified, without knowing what the proposed reclassification was, then the results were merged. At 4 minutes per report this truly stakhanovite effort took 90 working days. I sympathize, but I wonder what the rules are in Saarland for experiments involving living beings, particularly graduate students.

Precise criteria were used for the reclassification; for example a report describes a bug, in the authors’ view, if it mentions a null pointer exception (I will skip the opportunity of a pitch for Eiffel’s void safety mechanism), says that the code has to be corrected to fix the semantics, or if there is a “memory issue” or infinite loop. These criteria are reasonable if a bit puzzling (why null pointer exceptions and not other crashes such as arithmetic overflows?); but more worryingly there is no justification for them. I wonder  how much of the huge discrepancy found by the authors — a third or reported bugs are not bugs, and 40% of supposedly defective program files are not defective — can be simply explained by different classification criteria applied by the software projects under examination. The authors give no indication that they interacted with the people in charge of these projects. To me this is the major question hovering over this paper and its spectacular results. If you are in the room and get the chance, don’t hesitate to ask this question on my behalf or yours!

Another obvious question is how much the results depend on the five projects selected. If there ever was room for replicating a study (a practice whose rarity in software engineering we lament, but whose growth prospects are limited by the near-impossibility of convincing selective software engineering venues to publish confirmatory empirical studies), this would be it. In particular it would be good to see some of the results for commercial products.

The article offers an explanation for the phenomena it uncovered: in its view, the reason why so many bug reports end up misclassified is the difference of perspective between users of the software, who complain about the problems they encounter,  and the software professionals  who prepare the actual bug reports. The explanation is plausible but I was surprised not to see any concrete evidence that supports it. It is also surprising that the referees did not ask the authors to provide more solid arguments to buttress that explanation. Yet another opportunity to raise your hand and ask a question.

This (impressive) paper will call everyone’s attention to the critical problem of data quality in empirical studies. It is very professionally prepared, and could, in addition to its specific contributions, serve as a guide on how to get an empirical software engineering paper accepted at ICSE: take a critical look at an important research area; study it from a viewpoint that has not been considered much so far; perform an extensive study, with reasonable methodological assumptions; derive a couple of striking results, making sure they are both visibly stated and backed by the evidence; and include exactly one boxplot.

Notes and references

[1] This article review is part of the “Reading Notes” series. General disclaimer here.

[2] Kim Herzig, Sascha Just and Andreas Zeller: It’s not a Bug, it’s a Feature: How Misclassification Impacts Bug Prediction, in ICSE 2013, available here. According to the ICSE program the paper will be presented on May 23 in the Bug Prediction session, 16 to 17:30.

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Reading notes: the design of bug fixes

 

To inaugurate the “Reading Notes” series [1] I will take articles from the forthcoming International Conference on Software Engineering. Since I am not going to ICSE this year I am instead spending a little time browsing through the papers, obligingly available on the conference site. I’ll try whenever possible to describe a paper before it is presented at the conference, to alert readers to interesting sessions. I hope in July and August to be able to do the same for some of the papers to be presented at ESEC/FSE [2].

Please note the general disclaimer [1].

The Design of Bug Fixes [3] caught my attention partly for selfish reasons, since we are working, through the AutoFix project [3], on automatic bug fixing, but also out of sheer interest and because I have seen previous work by some of the authors. There have been article about bug patterns before, but not so much is known with credible empirical evidence about bug fixes (corrections of faults). When a programmer encounters a fault, what strategies does he use to correct it? Does he always produce the best fix he can, and if so, why not? What is the influence of the project phase on such decisions (e.g. will you fix a bug the same way early in the process and close to shipping)? These are some of the questions addressed by the paper.

The most interesting concrete result is a list of properties of bug fixes, classified along two criteria: nature of a fix (the paper calls it “design space”), and reasoning behind the choice of a fix. Here are a few examples of the “nature” classification:

  • Data propagation: the bug arises in a component, fix it in another, for example a library class.
  • More or less accuracy: are we fixing the symptom or the cause?
  • Behavioral alternatives: rather than directly correcting the reported problem, change the user-experienced behavior (evoking the famous quip that “it’s not a bug, it’s a feature”). The authors were surprised to see that developers (belying their geek image) seem to devote a lot of effort trying to understand how users actually use the products, but also found that even so developers do not necessarily gain a solid, objective understanding of these usage patterns. It would be interesting to know if the picture is different for traditional locally-installed products and for cloud-based offerings, since in the latter case it is possible to gather more complete, accurate and timely usage data.

On the “reasoning” side, the issue is why and how programmers decide to adopt a particular approach. For example, bug fixes tend to be more audacious (implying redesign if appropriate) at the beginning of a project, and more conservative as delivery nears and everyone is scared of breaking something. Another object of the study is how deeply developers understand the cause rather than just the symptom; the paper reports that 18% “did not have time to figure out why the bug occurred“. Surprising or not, I don’t know, but scary! Yet another dimension is consistency: there is a tension between providing what might ideally be the best fix and remaining consistent with the design decisions that underlie a software system throughout its architecture.

I was more impressed by the individual categories of the classification than by that classification as a whole; some of the categories appear redundant (“interface breakage“, “data propagation” and “internal vs external“, for example, seem to be pretty much the same; ditto for “cause understanding” and “accuracy“). On the other hand the paper does not explicitly claim that the categories are orthogonal. If they turn this conference presentation into a journal article I am pretty sure they will rework the classification and make it more robust. It does not matter that it is a bit shaky at the moment since the main insights are in the individual kinds of fix and fix-reasoning uncovered by the study.

The authors are from Microsoft Research (one of them was visiting faculty) and interviewed numerous programmers from various Microsoft product groups to find out how they fix bugs.

The paper is nicely written and reads easily. It includes some audacious syntax, as in “this dimension” [internal vs external] “describes how much internal code is changed versus external code is changed as part of a fix“. It has a discreet amount of humor, some of which may escape non-US readers; for example the authors explain that when approaching programmers out of the blue for the survey they tried to reassure them through the words “we are from Microsoft Research, and we are here to help“, a wry reference to the celebrated comment by Ronald Reagan (or his speechwriter) that the most dangerous words in the English language are “I am from the government, and I am here to help“. To my taste the authors include too many details about the data collection process; I would have preferred the space to be used for a more detailed discussion of the findings on bug fixes. On the other hand we all know that papers to selective conferences are written for referees, not readers, and this amount of methodological detail was probably the minimum needed to get past the reviewers (by avoiding the typical criticism, for empirical software engineering research, that the sample is too small, the questions biased etc.). Thankfully, however, there is no pedantic discussion of statistical significance; the authors openly present the results as dependent on the particular population surveyed and on the interview technique. Still, these results seem generalizable in their basic form to a large subset of the industry. I hope their publication will spawn more detailed studies.

According to the ICSE program the paper will be presented on May 23 in the Debugging session, 13:30 to 15:30.

Notes and references

[1] This article review is part of the “Reading Notes” series. General disclaimer here.

[2] European Software Engineering Conference 2013, Saint Petersburg, Russia, 18-24 August, see here.

[3] Emerson Murphy-Hill, Thomas Zimmerman, Christian Bird and Nachiappan Nagapan: The Design of Bug Fixes, in ICSE 2013, available here.

[4] AutoFix project at ETH Zurich, see project page here.

[5] Ronald Reagan speech extract on YouTube.

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Specify less to prove more

Software verification is progressing slowly but surely. Much of that progress is incremental: making the fundamental results applicable to real programs as they are built every day by programmers working in standard circumstances. A key condition is to minimize the amount of annotations that they have to provide.

The article mentioned in my previous post, “Program Checking With Less Hassle” [1], to be presented at VSTTE in San Francisco on Friday by its lead author, Julian Tschannen, introduces several interesting contributions in this direction. One of the surprising conclusions is that sometimes it pays to specify less. That goes against intuition: usually, the more specification information (correctness annotations) you provide the more you help the prover. But in fact partial specifications can hurt rather than help. Consider for example a swap routine with a partial specification, which actually stands in the way of a proof. If modularity is not a concern, for example if the routine is part of the code being verified rather than of a library, it may be more effective to ignore the specification and use the routine’s implementation. This is particularly appropriate for smallhelper routines such as the swap example.

This inlining technique is applicable in other cases, for example to make up for a missing precondition: assume that a helper routine will only work for x > 0 but does not state that precondition, or maybe states only the weaker one x ≥ 0 ; in the code, however, it is only called with positive arguments. If we try to verify the code modularly we will fail, as indeed we should since the routine is incorrect as a general-purpose primitive. But within the context of the code there is nothing wrong with it. Forgetting the contract of the routine if any, and instead using its actual implementation, we may be able to show that everything is fine.

Another component of the approach is to fill in preconditions that programmers have omitted because they are somehow obvious to them. For example it is tempting and common to write just a [1] > 0 rather than a /= Void and then a [1] > 0 for a detachable array a. The tool takes care of  interpreting the simpler precondition as the more complete one.

The resulting “two-step verification”, integrated into the AutoProof verification tool for Eiffel, should turn out to be an important simplification towards the goal of “Verification As a Matter Of Course” [2].

References

[1] Julian Tschannen, Carlo A. Furia, Martin Nordio and Bertrand Meyer: Program Checking With Less Hassle, in VSTTE 2013, Springer LNCS, to appear, draft available here; presentation on May 17 in the 15:30-16:30  session.

[2] Verification As a Matter Of Course, article in this blog, 29 March 2010, see here.

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Presentations at ICSE and VSTTE

 

The following presentations from our ETH group in the ICSE week (International Conference on Software Engineering, San Francisco) address important issues of software specification and verification, describing new techniques that we have recently developed as part of our work building EVE, the Eiffel Verification Environment. One is at ICSE proper and the other at VSTTE (Verified Software: Tools, Theories, Experiments). If you are around please attend them.

Julian Tschannen will present Program Checking With Less Hassle, written with Carlo A. Furia, Martin Nordio and me, at VSTTE on May 17 in the 15:30-16:30 session (see here in the VSTTE program. The draft is available here. I will write a blog article about this work in the coming days.

Nadia Polikarpova will present What Good Are Strong Specifications?, written with , Carlo A. Furia, Yu Pei, Yi Wei and me at ICSE on May 22 in the 13:30-15:30 session (see here in the ICSE program). The draft is available here. I wrote about this paper in an earlier post: see here. It describes the systematic application of theory-based modeling to the full specification and verification of advanced software.

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LASER summer school: Software for the Cloud and Big Data

The 2013 LASER summer school, organized by our chair at ETH, will take place September 8-14, once more in the idyllic setting of the Hotel del Golfo in Procchio, on the island of Elba in Italy. This is already the 10th conference; the roster of speakers so far reads like a who’s who of software engineering.

The theme this year is Software for the Cloud and Big Data and the speakers are Roger Barga from Microsoft, Karin Breitman from EMC,  Sebastian Burckhardt  from Microsoft,  Adrian Cockcroft from Netflix,  Carlo Ghezzi from Politecnico di Milano,  Anthony Joseph from Berkeley,  Pere Mato Vila from CERN and I.

LASER always has a strong practical bent, but this year it is particularly pronounced as you can see from the list of speakers and their affiliations. The topic is particularly timely: exploring the software aspects of game-changing developments currently redefining the IT scene.

The LASER formula is by now well-tuned: lectures over seven days (Sunday to Saturday), about five hours in the morning and three in the early evening, by world-class speakers; free time in the afternoon to enjoy the magnificent surroundings; 5-star accommodation and food in the best hotel of Elba, made affordable as we come towards the end of the season (and are valued long-term customers). The group picture below is from last year’s school.

Participants are from both industry and academia and have ample opportunities for interaction with the speakers, who typically attend each others’ lectures and engage in in-depth discussions. There is also time for some participant presentations; a free afternoon to discover Elba and brush up on your Napoleonic knowledge; and a boat trip on the final day.

Information about the 2013 school can be found here.

LASER 2012, Procchio, Hotel del Golvo

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Public lecture at ITMO

I am giving my “inaugural lecture” at ITMO in Saint Petersburg tomorrow (Thursday, 28 February 2013) at 14 (2 PM) local time, meaning e.g. 11 AM in Western Europe and 2 AM (ouch!) in California. See here for the announcement. The title is “Programming: Magic, Art, Routine or Science?“. The talk will be streamed live: see here.

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Conferences: Publication, Communication, Sanction

Recycled(This article was first published in the Communications of the ACM blog.)

A healthy discussion is taking place in the computer science community on our publication culture. It was spurred by Lance Fortnow’s 2009 article [1]; now Moshe Vardi has taken the lead to prepare a report on the topic, following a workshop in Dagstuhl in November [2]. The present article and one that follows (“The Waves of Publication”)  are intended as contributions to the debate.

One of the central issues is what to do with conferences. Fortnow had strong words for the computer science practice of using conferences as the selective publication venues, instead of relying on journals as traditional scientific disciplines do. The criticism is correct, but if we look at the problem from a practical perspective it is unlikely that top conferences will lose their role as certifiers of quality. This is not a scientific matter but one of power. People in charge of POPL or OOPSLA have decisive sway over the careers (one is tempted to say the lives) of academics, particularly young academics, and it is a rare situation in human affairs that people who have critical power voluntarily renounce it. Maybe the POPL committee will see the light: maybe starting in 2014 it will accept all reasonable papers somehow related to “principles of programming languages”, turn the event itself into a pleasant multi-track community affair where everyone in the field can network, and hand over the selection and stamp-of-approval job to a journal such as TOPLAS. Dream on; it is not going to happen.

We should not, however, remain stuck with the status quo and all its drawbacks. That situation is unsustainable. As a single illustration, consider the requirement, imposed by all conferences, that having a paper pass the refereeing process is not enough: you must also register. A couple of months before the conference, authors of accepted papers (at least, they thought their paper was accepted) receive a threatening email telling them that unless they register and pay their paper will not be published after all. Now assume an author, in a field where a conference is the top token of recognition, has his visa application rejected by the country of the conference — a not so uncommon situation — and does not register. (Maybe he does not mind paying the fee, but he does not want to lie by pretending he is going to attend whereas he knows he will not.) He has lost his opportunity for publication and perhaps severely harmed this career. What have such requirements to do with science?

To understand what can be done, we need to analyze the role of conferences. In an earlier article  [3] I described four “modes and uses” of publication: Publication, Exam, Business and Ritual. From the organizers’ viewpoint, ignoring the Business and Ritual aspects although they do play a significant role, a conference has three roles: Publication, Communication and Sanction. The publication part corresponds to the proceedings of the conference, which makes articles available to the community at large, not just the conference attendees. The communication part only addresses the attendees: it includes the presentation of papers as well as all other interactions made possible by being present at a conference. The sanction part (corresponding to the “exam” part of the more general classification) is the role of a renowned conference as a stamp of approval for the best work of the moment.

What we should do is separate these roles. A conference can play all three roles, but it can also select two of them, or even just one. A well-established, prestigious conference will want to retain its sanctioning role: accepted papers get the stamp of approval. It will also remain an event, where people meet. And it may distribute proceedings. But the three roles can also be untied:

  • Publication is the least critical, and can easily be removed from the other two, since everything will be available on the Web. In fact the very notion of proceedings is quickly becoming fuzzy: more and more conferences save money by not distributing printed proceedings to attendees, sometimes not printing any proceedings at all; and some even spare themselves the production of a proceedings-on-a-stick, putting the material on the Web instead. A conference may still decide to have its own proceedings, or it might outsource that part to a journal. Each conference will make these decisions based on its own culture, tradition, ambition and constraints. For authors, the decision does not particularly matter: what counts are the sanction, which is provided by the refereeing process, and the availability of their material to the world, which will be provided in any scenario (at least in computer science where we have, thankfully, the permission to put our papers on our own web sites, an acquired right that our colleagues from other disciplines do not all enjoy).
  • Separating sanction from communication is a natural step. Acceptance and participation are two different things.

Conference organizers should not be concerned about lost revenue: most authors will still want to participate in the conference, and will get the funding since institutions are used to pay for travel to present accepted papers; some new participants might come, attracted by more interaction-oriented conference styles; and organizers can replace the requirement to register by a choice between registering and paying a publication fee.

Separating the three roles does not mean that any established conference renounces its sanctioning status, acquired through the hard work of building the conference’s reputation, often over decades. But everyone gets more flexibility. Several combinations are possible, such as:

  • Sanction without communication or publication: papers are submitted for certification through peer-review, they are available on the Web anyway, and there is no need for a conference.
  • Publication without sanction or communication: an author puts a paper on his web page or on a self-publication site such as ArXiv.
  • Sanction and communication without publication: a traditional selective conference, which does not bother to produce proceedings.
  • Communication without sanction: a working conference whose sole aim is to advance the field through presentations and discussions, and accepts any reasonable submission. It may be by invitation (a kind of advance sanction). It may have proceedings (publication) or not.

Once we understand that the three roles are not inextricably tied, the stage is clear for removal for some impediments to a more effective publication culture. Some, not all. The more general problem is the rapidly changing nature of scientific publication, what may be called the concentric waves of publication. That will be the topic of the next article.

References

[1] Lance Fortnow: Time for Computer Science to Grow Up, in Communications of the ACM, Vol. 52, no. 8, pages 33-35, 2009, available here.

[2] Dagstuhl: Perspectives Workshop: Publication Culture in Computing Research, see here.

[3] Bertrand Meyer: The Modes and Uses of Scientific Publication, article on this blog, 22 November 2011, see here.

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ESEC/FSE 2013: 18-26 August, Saint Petersburg, Russia

The European Software Engineering Conference takes place every two years in connection with the ACM Foundations of Software Engineering symposium (which in even years is in the US). The next ESEC/FSE  will be held for the first time in Russia, where it will be the first major international software engineering conference ever. It comes at a time when the Russian software industry is ever more present through products and services offered worldwide. See the conference site here. The main conference will be held 21-23 August 2013, with associated events before and after so that the full dates are August 18 to 26. (I am the general chair.)

Other than ICSE, ESEC/FSE is second to none in the quality of the program. We already have four outstanding keynote speakers:  Georges Gonthier from Microsoft Research, Paola Inverardi from L’Aquila in Italy, David Notkin from U. of Washington (in whose honor a symposium will be held as an associated event of ESEC/FSE, chaired by Michael Ernst), and Moshe Vardi of Rice and of course Communications of the ACM.

Saint Petersburg is one of the most beautiful cities in the world, strewn with gilded palaces, canals, world-class museums (not just the Hermitage), and everywhere mementos of the great poets, novelists, musicians and scientists who built up its fame.

Hosted by ITMO National Research University, the conference will be held in the magnificent building of the Razumovsky Palace on the banks of the Moika river; see here.

The Call for Papers has a deadline of March 1st, so there is still plenty of time to polish your best paper and send it to ESEC/FSE. There is also still time to propose worskhops and other associated events. ESEC/FSE will be a memorable moment for the community and we hope to see many of the readers there.

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Talks in coming months

 

Here is a list of some presentations I am scheduled to give in the near future. Time for the faithful followers of this blog to start organizing groupie trips and get ready to haggle with the ticket scalpers and queue up at 3 AM for the best seats.

On May 9 I will give a talk in Paris, at Valtech, on the topic “Eiffel: Objects, Languages, Concurrency” [1]. It will be a general overview talk (in French) describing the key concepts of the Eiffel method and new developments.

On May 17 I will give a keynote at the Russian conference on IT education [2]. I haven’t sent a title and abstract yet but will talk about our experience of teaching introductory programming at ETH, now for 9 years, supported by the Touch of Class textbook which is now available in Russian. The talk itself will be in Russian.

On Tuesday, 29 May, I will give a keynote at TOOLS EUROPE in Prague [2]. This is the 50th TOOLS conference, a milestone, and I will talk on the theme of the conference, “The Triumph of Objects”, to assess the impact of object technology on the field of IT.

I am also giving a keynote at MSEPT (Multicore Software Engineering, Performance and Tools) the same week, on May 31. MSEPT [4] is co-located with TOOLS in Prague. The title of my presentation is “Concurrent Programming is Easy” and I will in particular present new developments in the SCOOP model and our first steps in the Concurrency Made Easy ERC Advanced Investigator Project. In addition I will be participating in two Eiffel-related workshops at TOOLS, WAVE on Advances in Verification for Eiffel, May 29 [5], where we are submitting several papers, and the third “Eiffel Web Design Feast” on May 30, part of a community project that is building an Eiffel-based Web development framework [6].

On June 5 I am giving an invited talk at the New Faculty Symposium of ICSE (International Conference on Software Engineering) in Zurich [7]. The title (assigned by the organizers) is “Promoting your ideas”. I did warn the organizers that this would be a contrarian talk as I find the current computer science publication culture in need of a reboot — this is the goal of the November Dagstuhl workshop mentioned below — but they said it was OK; I might even have heard the word “welcome” at some point.

On June 12 I will deliver a keynote at the International Conference on Reliable Software Technologies, also known as Ada-Europe, in Stockholm  [8]. The Ada community remains significant and is becoming interested in contracts, hence the subject of my talk: Life with Contracts. I will summarize the experience gained in applying Design by Contract as a core principle throughout development, and the next steps in developing the approach.

On June 24 I am  on one of the two panels at the Alan Turing Centenary Conference in Manchester [9]; the panel is entitled The Big Questions in Computation, Intelligence and Life.

In Seattle, 16-20 July, I look forward to presenting our latest verification ideas to the other members of the IFIP Working Group 2.3 on programming methodology [10]; this is the toughest and most unforgiving audience I know, but their feedback has always proved invaluable.

The next set of talks (apart from a possible presentation at the Snowbird conference in July, which I haven’t confirmed yet) is at our LASER summer school in Elba, September 2-8 [11], where I will deliver a set of lectures entitled Eiffel: a study in language design and evolution; it will be an in-depth discussion of issues that arise in devising a quality-focused programming language and managing its continued refinement over a long period, focusing on a few key design principles.

A few weeks later, on September 26, in Natal, I will present a keynote at the Brazilian software engineering conference, SBES [12]. I will talk about concurrency again, hoping of course to have new results to showcase by then.

Another event in which I am involved and expect to give a presentation is a Dagstuhl “Perspectives” workshop on the Publication Culture in Computer Science, November 6-9 [13]. The workshop was set up on the initiative of Moshe Vardi and I am one of the organizers. There is a widespread feeling that the publication model of computer science is broken; a number of articles in this blog have discussed the issues. At Dagstuhl we hope to be able to start fixing the process. Stay tuned.

References

[1] Talk at Valtech, 9 May 2012, information here.

[2] 10th All-Russian conference on IT education, Moscow, 16-18 May 2012, conference page here.

[3] TOOLS Europe 2012, Prague, 28 May – 1 June 2012, conference page here.

[4] MSEPT: International Conference on Multicore Software Engineering, Performance, and Tools, Prague, 31 May – June 1, 2012, conference page here.

[5] Workshop on Advances in Verification for Eiffel (WAVE), Prague, 29 May 2012, workshop page here.

[6] Eiffel Web Design Feast, Prague, 30 May 2012, call for participation available here.

[7] New Faculty Symposium at the International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE), Zurich, 5 June 2012, symposium page here.

[8] 17th International Conference on Reliable Software Technologies (Ada Europe 2012), Stockholm, 11-15 June 2012, conference page here.

[9] Alan Turing Centenary Conference, Manchester, 11-25 June 2012, conference page here.

[10] IFIP TC2-WG2.3 (Working group on Programming Methodology), group page here (meetings by invitation only).

[11] LASER summer school 2012, Innovative Languages for Software Engineering, 2-8 September 2012 (other speakers are Andrei Alexandrescu on D, Roberto Ierusalimschy on Lua, Ivar Jacobson on UML and SEMAT, Eric Meijer on C# and Linq, Martin Odersky on Scala, Simon Peyton-Jones on Haskell, and Guido van Rossum on Python; school page here.

[12] XXVI Brazilian Symposium on Software Engineering (SBES), part of CBSoft (3rd Brazilian Conference on Software: Theory and Practice), Natal, 23-28 September 2012, symposium page here.

[13] Perspectives Workshop: Publication Culture in Computing Research (by invitation), Dagstuhl, 6-9 November 2012, workshop page here.

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TOOLS 2012, “The Triumph of Objects”, Prague in May: Call for Workshops

Workshop proposals are invited for TOOLS 2012, The Triumph of Objectstools.ethz.ch, to be held in Prague May 28 to June 1. TOOLS is a federated set of conferences:

  • TOOLS EUROPE 2012: 50th International Conference on Objects, Models, Components, Patterns.
  • ICMT 2012: 5th International Conference on Model Transformation.
  • Software Composition 2012: 10th International Conference.
  • TAP 2012: 6th International Conference on Tests And Proofs.
  • MSEPT 2012: International Conference on Multicore Software Engineering, Performance, and Tools.

Workshops, which are normally one- or two-day long, provide organizers and participants with an opportunity to exchange opinions, advance ideas, and discuss preliminary results on current topics. The focus can be on in-depth research topics related to the themes of the TOOLS conferences, on best practices, on applications and industrial issues, or on some combination of these.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Submission proposal implies the organizers’ commitment to organize and lead the workshop personally if it is accepted. The proposal should include:

  •  Workshop title.
  • Names and short bio of organizers .
  • Proposed duration.
  •  Summary of the topics, goals and contents (guideline: 500 words).
  •  Brief description of the audience and community to which the workshop is targeted.
  • Plans for publication if any.
  • Tentative Call for Papers.

Acceptance criteria are:

  • Organizers’ track record and ability to lead a successful workshop.
  •  Potential to advance the state of the art.
  • Relevance of topics and contents to the topics of the TOOLS federated conferences.
  •  Timeliness and interest to a sufficiently large community.

Please send the proposals to me (Bertrand.Meyer AT inf.ethz.ch), with a Subject header including the words “TOOLS WORKSHOP“. Feel free to contact me if you have any question.

DATES

  •  Workshop proposal submission deadline: 17 February 2012.
  • Notification of acceptance or rejection: as promptly as possible and no later than February 24.
  • Workshops: 28 May to 1 June 2012.

 

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Concurrency seminars

Ever more people are realizing that concurrency is at the center of IT challenges for the next decades. Concurrent programming remains as hard as ever; we have put together a one-day seminar that helps understand the concepts and build successful concurrent applications. The sessions for the first few months of 2012 are:

  • Palo Alto (February 15)
  • Zurich, (March 2)
  • London (March 22)
  • Paris (May 10)
  • Stockholm (June 15)
  • Seattle (July 20)

and the seminar program is available here.

 

 

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European Computer Science Summit 2011

The program for ECSS 2011 (Milan, 7-9 November) has just been put online [1]. The European Computer Science Summit, held yearly since 2005, is the annual conference of Informatics Europe and a unique opportunity to discuss issues of interest to the computer science / informatics research and education community; much of the audience is made of deans, department heads, lab directors, researchers and senior faculty. Keynote speakers this year include Stefano Ceri, Mary Fernández, Monika Henzinger, Willem Jonker, Miron Livny, John Mylopoulos, Xavier Serra and John White.

ECSS is not a typical scientific conference; like Snowbird, its counterpart in the US, it is focused on professional and policy issues, and also a place to hear from technology leaders about their research visions. For me it is one of the most interesting events of the year.

References

[1] ECSS home page including advance program, here.

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Agile methods: the good, the bad and the ugly

It was a bit imprudent last Monday to announce the continuation of the SCOOP discussion for this week; with the TOOLS conference happening now, with many satellite events such as the Eiffel Design Feast of the past week-end and today’s “New Eiffel Technology Community” workshop, there is not enough time for a full article. Next week might also be problematic. The SCOOP series will resume, but in the meantime I will report on other matters.

As something that can be conveniently typed in while sitting in the back of the TOOLS room during fascinating presentations, here is a bit of publicity for the next round of one-day seminars for industry — “Compact Course” is the official terminology — that I will be teaching at ETH in Zurich next November (one in October), some of them with colleagues. It’s the most extensive session that we have ever done; you can see the full programs and registration information here.

  • Software Engineering for Outsourced and Distributed Development, 27 October 2011
    Taught with Peter Kolb and Martin Nordio
  • Requirements Engineering, 17 November
  • Software Testing and Verification: state of the art, 18 November
    With Carlo Furia and Sebastian Nanz
  • Agile Methods: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly, 23 November
  • Concepts and Constructs of Concurrent Computation, 24 November
    With Sebastian Nanz
  • Design by Contract, 25 November

The agile methods course is new; its summary reads almost like a little blog article, so here it is.

Agile methods: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Agile methods are wonderful. They’ll give you software in no time at all, turn your customers and users into friends, catch bugs before they catch you, change the world, and boost your love life. Do you believe these claims (even excluding the last two)? It’s really difficult to form an informed opinion, since most of the presentations of eXtreme Programming and other agile practices are intended to promote them (and the consultants to whom they provide a living), not to deliver an objective assessment.

If you are looking for a guru-style initiation to the agile religion, this is not the course for you. What it does is to describe in detail the corpus of techniques covered by the “agile” umbrella (so that you can apply them effectively to your developments), and assess their contribution to software engineering. It is neither “for” nor “against” agile methods but fundamentally descriptive, pedagogical, objective and practical. The truth is that agile methods include some demonstrably good ideas along with some whose benefits are at best dubious. In addition (and this should not be a surprise) they cannot make the fundamental laws of software engineering go away.

Agile methods have now been around for more than a decade, during which many research teams, applying proven methods of experimental science, have performed credible empirical studies of how well the methods really work and how they compare to more traditional software engineering practices. This important body of research results, although not widely known, is critical to managers and developers in industry for deciding whether and how to use agile development. The course surveys these results, emphasizing the ones most directly relevant to practitioners.

A short discussion session will enable participants with experience in agile methods to share their results.

Taking this course will give you a strong understanding of agile development, and a clear view of when, where and how to apply them.

Schedule

Morning session: A presentation of agile methods

  • eXtreme Programming, pair programming, Scrum, Test-Driven Development, continuous integration, refactoring, stakeholder involvement, feature-driven development etc.
  • The agile lifecycle.
  • Variants: lean programming etc.

Afternoon session (I): Assessment of agile methods

  • The empirical software engineering literature: review of available studies. Assessment of their value. Principles of empirical software engineering.
  • Agile methods under the scrutiny of empirical research: what helps, what harms, and what has no effect? How do agile methods fare against traditional techniques?
  • Examples: pair programming versus code reviews; tests versus specifications; iterative development versus “Big Upfront Everything”.

Afternoon session (II): Discussion and conclusion

This final part of the course will present, after a discussion session involving participants with experience in agile methods, a summary of the contribution of agile methods to software engineering.

It will conclude with advice for organizations involved in software development and interested in applying agile methods in their own environment.

Target groups

CIOs; software project leaders; software developers; software testers and QA engineers.

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In praise of Knuth and Liskov

In November of 2005, as part of the festivities of its 150-th anniversary, the ETH Zurich bestowed honorary doctorates on Don Knuth and Barbara Liskov. I gave the speech (the “laudatio”). It was published in Informatik Spektrum, the journal of Gesellschaft für Informatik, the German Computer Society, vo. 29, no. 1, February 2006, pages 74-76; I came across it recently and thought others might be interested in this homage to two great computer scientists.  The beginning was in German; I translated it into English. I also replaced a couple of German expressions by their translations: “ETH commencement” for ETH-Tag (the official name of the annual ceremony) and “main building” for Hauptgebäude.

I took this picture of Wirth, Liskov and Knuth (part of my gallery of computer scientists)  later that same day.

 

Laudatio

 In an institution, Ladies and Gentlement, which so proudly celebrates its hundred-and-fiftieth anniversary, a relatively young disciplines sometimes has cause for envy. We computer scientists are still the babies, or at least the newest kids on the block. Outside of this building, for example, you will see streets bearing such names as Clausius, yet there is neither a Von Neumann Lane nor a a Wirth Square. Youth, however,  also has its advantages; perhaps the most striking is that we still can, in our own lifetime, meet in person some of the very founders of our discipline. No living physicist has seen Newton; no chemist has heard Lavoisier. For us, it works. Today, Ladies and Gentlemen, we have the honor of introducing two of the undisputed pioneers of informatics.

Barbara Liskov

The first of our honorees today is Professor Barbara Liskov. To understand her contributions it is essential to realize the unfair competition in which the so-called Moore’s law pits computer software against computing hardware. To match the astounding progress of computing speed and memory over the past five decades, all that we have on the software side is our own intelligence which, it is safe to say, doesn’t double every eighteen months at constant price. The key to scaling up is abstraction; all advances in programming methodology have relied on new abstraction techniques. Perhaps the most significant is data abstraction, which enables us to organize complex systems on the basis of the types of objects they manipulate, defined in completely abstract terms. This is the notion of abstract data type, a staple component today of every software curriculum, including in the very first programming course here ETH. it was introduced barely thirty years ago in a seemingly modest article in SIGPLAN Notices — the kind of publication that hardly registers a ripple in science indexes — by Barbara Liskov and Stephen Zilles. Few papers have had a more profound impact on the theory and practice of software development than this contribution, “Programming with Abstract Data Types”.

The idea of abstract data types, or ADTs, is one of those Egg of Christopher Columbus moments; a seemingly simple intuition that changes the course of things. An ADT is a class of objects described in terms not of their internal properties, but of the operations applicable to them, and the abstract properties of these operations. Not by what they are, but by what they have. A rather capitalistic view of the world, but well suited to the description of complex systems where each part knows as little as possible about the others to protect itself about their future changes.

An abstraction such as ETH-Commencement could be described in a very concrete way: it happens in a certain place, consists of one event after another, gathers so many people. This is what we computer scientists call an implementation-oriented view, and relying on it means that we can’t change any detail without endangering the consistency of other processes, such as the daily planning of room allocation in the Main Building, which use it. In an ADT view, the abstraction “ETH Commencement” is characterized not by what it is but by what it has: a start, an end, an audience, and operations such as “Schedule the ETH Commencement”, “ Reschedule it”, “Start it”, “End it”. They provide to the rest of the world a clean, precisely specified interface which enables every ADT to use every other based on the minimum properties it requires, thus isolating them from irrelevant internal changes, and providing an irreplaceable weapon in the incessant task of software engineering: battling complexity.

Barbara Liskov didn’t stay with the theoretical concepts but implemented the ideas in the CLU language, one of the most influential of the set of programming languages that in the nineteen-seventies changed our perspective of how to develop good software.

She went on to seminal work on operating systems and distributed computing, introducing several widely applied concepts such as guardians, and always backing her theoretical innovations by building practical systems, from the CLU language and compiler to the Argus and Mercury distributed operating systems. Distributed systems, such as those which banks, airlines and other global enterprises run on multiple machines across multiple networks, raise particularly challenging issues. To quote from the introduction of her article on Argus:

A centralized system is either running or crashed, but a distributed system may be partly running and partly crashed. Distributed programs must cope with failures of the underlying hardware. Both the nodes and the network may fail. The goal of Argus is to provide mechanisms that make it easier for programmers to cope with these problems.

Barbara Liskov’s work introduced seminal concepts to deal with these extremely difficult problems.

Now Ford professor of engineering at MIT, she received not long ago the prestigious John von Neumann award of the IEEE; she has been one of the most influential people in software engineering. We are grateful for how Professor Barbara Liskov has helped shape the field are honored to have her at ETH today.

 Donald Knuth

In computer science and beyond, the name of Donald Knuth carries a unique aura. A professor at Stanford since 1968, now emeritus, he is the only person on record whose job title is the title of his own book: Professor of the Art of Computer Programming. This is for his eponymous multi-volume treatise, which established the discipline of algorithm analysis, and has had more effect than any other computer science publication. The Art of Computer Programming is a marvel of breadth, depth, completeness, mathematical rigor and clarity, not to forget humor. In that legendary book you will find exposed in detail the algorithms and data structures that lie at the basis of all software applications today. A Monte Carlo simulation, as a physicists may use, requires a number sequence that is both very long and very random-looking, even though the computer is a deterministic machine; if the simulation is any good, it almost certainly relies on the devious techniques which The Art of Computer Programming presents for making a perfectly deterministic sequence appear to have no order or other recognizable property. If you are running complex programs on your laptop, and they keep creating millions of software objects without clogging up gigabytes of memory, chances are the author of the garbage collector program is using techniques he learned from Knuth, with such delightful names as “the Buddy System”. If your search engine can at the blink of an eye find a needle of useful information in a haystack of tens of billions of Web pages, it’s most likely because they’ve been indexed using finely tuned data structures, such as hash tables, for which Knuth has been the reference for three decades through volume three, Searching and Sorting.

Knuth is famous for his precision and attention to detail, going so far as to offer a financial reward for every error found in his books, although one suspects this doesn’t cost him too much since people are so proud that instead of cashing the check they have it framed for display. The other immediately striking characteristic of Knuth is how profoundly he is driven by esthetics. This applies to performing arts, as anyone who was in the Fraumünster this morning and found out who the organist was can testify, but even more to his scientific work. The very title “the Art of computer programming” betrays this. Algorithms and data structures for Knuth are never dull codes for computers, but objects of intense esthetic pleasure and friendly discussion. This concern with beauty led to a major turn in his career, which delayed the continuation of the book series by many years but resulted in a development that has affected anyone who publishes scientific text. As he received the page proofs of the second edition of one of the volumes in the late seventies he was so repelled by its physical appearance, resulting from newly introduced computer typesetting technology, that he decided to build a revolutionary font design and text processing system, all by himself, from the ground up. This resulted in a number of publications such as a long and fascinating paper in the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society entitled “The Letter S”, but even more importantly in widely successful and practical software programs which he wrote himself, TeX and Metafont, which have today become standards for scientific publishing. Here too he has shown the way in quality and rigor, being one of the very few people in the world who promise their software to be free of bugs, and backs that promise by giving a small financial reward for any counter-example.

His numerous other contributions are far too diverse to allow even a partial mention here; they have ranged across wide areas of computer science and mathematics.

To tell the truth, we are a little embarrassed that by bringing Professor Knuth here we are delaying by a bit more the long awaited release of volume 4. But we overcome this embarrassment in time to express our pride for having Donald Erwin Knuth at ETH for this anniversary celebration.

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About Watts Humphrey

Watts Humphrey, 2007

At FOSE (see previous post [1]) we will honor the memory of Watts Humphrey, the pioneer of disciplined software engineering, who left us in October. A blog entry on my Communications of the ACM blog [2] briefly recalls some of Humphrey’s main contributions.

References

[1] The Future Of Software Engineering: previous entry of this blog.
[2] Watts Humphrey: In Honor of a Pioneer, in CACM blog.

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The rise of empirical software engineering (II): what we are still missing

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Recycled(This article was initially published in the CACM blog.)

The previous post under  the heading of empirical software engineering hailed the remarkable recent progress of this field, made possible in particular by the availability of large-scale open-source repositories and by the opening up of some commercial code bases.

Has the empirical side of software engineering become a full member of empirical sciences? One component of the experimental method is still not quite there: reproducibility. It is essential to the soundness of natural sciences; when you publish a result there, the expectation is that others will be able to replicate it. Perhaps such duplication does not happen as often and physicists and biologists would have us believe, but it does happen, and the mere possibility that someone could check your results (and make a name for himself, especially if you are famous, by disproving them) keeps experimenters on their toes. 

If we had the same norms in empirical software engineering, empirical papers would all contain a clause such as

Hampi’s source code and documentation, experimental data, and additional results are available at http://people.csail.mit.edu/akiezun/hampi

This example is, in fact, a real quote, from a paper [1] at the 2009 ISSTA conference. It shows exactly what we expect for an experimental software engineering publication: below are my results, if you want to rerun the experiments here is the URL where you will find the code (source and binary) and the data.

Unfortunately, such professionalism is the exception rather than the rule. I performed a quick check — entirely informal, as this is a blog post, not an empirical research paper! — in the ISSTA ’09 proceedings. ISSTA, an ACM conference is a good sample point, since it covers testing (plus other approaches to program analysis) and almost every paper has an  “experiment” section. I found only a very small number that, like the one cited above, give explicit reproducibility information. (Disclosure: one of those papers is ours [2].)

I believe that the situation will change dramatically and that in a few years it will be impossible to submit an empirical paper without including such information. Computer science, or at least some areas of software engineering, should actually consider themselves privileged when it comes to allowing reproducibility: all that we have to do to reproduce a result, in testing for example, is to run a program. That is easier than for a zoologist — wishing to reproduce a colleague’s experiment precisely — to gather in his lab the appropriate number of flies, chimpanzees or killer whales.

In some types of empirical software research, such as the assessment of process models or design techniques, reproducing an experiment’s setup is harder than when all you have to do is to rerun a program. But regardless of the area we must develop a true  culture of reproducibility. It is not yet there. I have personally come to take experimental results with a grain of salt; not that I particulary suspect foul play, but I simply know how easy it is, in the absence of external validation, to make a mistake in the experiments and, unwittingly, publish a paper with wrong results.

Developing a culture of reproducibility also has an effect on the refereeing process. In submitting papers with precise instructions to reproduce our results, we have sometimes remarked that referees never contact us. I hope this means they always succeed; I suspect, however, that in many cases they just do not try. If you think further about the implications, providing reproducibility instructions for a submitted paper is scary: after all a software run may fail to run for marginal reasons, such as the wrong hardware configuration or a misunderstanding of the instructions. You do not want to perform all the extra work (of making your results reproducible) just to have the paper summarily rejected because the referee is running Windows 95. Ideally, then, referees should have the possibility to ask technical questions — but anonymously, since this is the way most refereeing works. Conferences and journals generally do not support such a process.

These obstacles are implementation issues, however, and will go away. What matters for the growth of the discipline is that it needs, like experimental sciences before it, to embrace a true culture of reproducibility.

References

[1] Adam Kieun, Vijay Ganesh, Philip J. Guo, Pieter Hooimeijer, Michael D. Ernst: HAMPI: A Solver for String Constraints, Proceedings of the 2009 ACM/SIGSOFT International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis (ISSTA ’09), July 19-23, 2009, Chicago.

[2] Nadia Polikarpova, Ilinca Ciupa  and Bertrand Meyer: A Comparative Study of Programmer-Written and Automatically Inferred Contracts, Proceedings of the 2009 ACM/SIGSOFT International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis (ISSTA ’09), July 19-23, 2009, Chicago.

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The rise of empirical software engineering (I): the good news

 

RecycledIn the next few days I will post a few comments about a topic of particular relevance to the future of our field: empirical software engineering. I am starting by reposting two entries originally posted in the CACM blog. Here is the first. Let me use this opportunity to mention the LASER summer school [1] on this very topic — it is still possible to register.

Empirical software engineering papers, at places like ICSE (the International Conference on Software Engineering), used to be terrible.

There were exceptions, of course, most famously papers by Basili, Zelkowitz, Rombach, Tichy, Berry, Humphrey, Gilb, Boehm, Lehmann, Belady and a few others, who kept hectoring the community about the need to base our opinions and practices on evidence rather than belief. But outside of these cases the typical ICSE empirical paper — I sat through a number of them — was depressing: we made these measurements in our company, found these results, just believe us. A question here in the back? Can you reproduce our results? Access our code? We’d love you to, but unfortunately we work for a company — the Call for Papers said industry contributions were welcome, didn’t it? — and we can’t give you the details. So sorry. But trust us, we checked our results.

Actually, there was another kind of empirical paper, which did not suffer from such secrecy: the university study. Hi, I am professor Bright, the well-known author of the Bright method of software development. Everyone knows it’s the best, but we wanted to assess it scientifically through a rigorous empirical study. I gave the same programming problem to two groups of third-year undergraduates; one group was told to use the Bright method, the other not. Guess what? The Bright group performed 67.94% better! I see the session chair wanting to move to the next speaker; see the details in the paper.

For years, this was most of what we had: unverifiable industry reports and unconvincing student experiments.

And suddenly the scene has changed. Empirical software engineering studies are in full bloom; the papers are flowing, and many are good!

What triggered this radical change is the availability of open-source repositories. Projects such as Linux, Eclipse, Apache, EiffelStudio and many others have records going back 10, 15, sometimes 20 years. These records contain the true history of the project: commits (into the configuration management system), bug reports, bug fixes, test runs and their results, developers involved, and many more elements of project data. All of a sudden empirical research has what any empirical science needs: a large corpus of objects to analyze.

Open-source projects have given the decisive jolt, but now we can rely on industrial data as well: Microsoft and other companies have started making their own records selectively available to researchers. In the work of authors such as Zeller from Sarrebruck, Gall from Uni. Zurich or Nagappan from Microsoft, systematic statistical techniques yield answers, sometimes surprising, to questions on which we could only speculate. Do novices or experts cause more bugs? Does test coverage correlate with software quality, and if so, positively or negatively? Little by little, we are learning about the true properties of software products and processes, based not on fantasies but on quantitative analysis of meaningful samples.

The trend is unmistakable, and irreversible.

Not all is right yet; in the second installment of this post I will describe some of what still needs to be improved for empirical software engineering to achieve full scientific rigor.

Reference

[1] LASER summer school 2010, at http://se.ethz.ch/laser.

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Programming on the cloud?

I am blogging live from the “Cloud Futures” conference organized by Microsoft in Redmond [1]. We had two excellent keynotes today, by Ed Lazowska [1] and David Patterson.

Lazowska emphasized the emergence of a new kind of science — eScience — based on analysis of enormous amounts of data. His key point was that this approach is a radical departure from “computational science” as we know it, based mostly on large simulations. With the eScience paradigm, the challenge is to handle the zillions of bytes of data that are available, often through continuous streams, in such fields as astronomy, oceanography or biology. It is unthinkable in his view to process such data through super-computing architectures specific to an institution; the Cloud is the only solution. One of the reasons (developed more explicitly in Patterson’s talk) is that cloud computing supports scaling down as well as scaling up. If your site experiences sudden bursts of popularity — say you get slashdotted — followed by downturns, you just cannot size the hardware right.

Lazowska also noted that it is impossible to convince your average  university president that Cloud is the way to go, as he will get his advice from the science-by-simulation  types. I don’t know who the president is at U. of Washington, but I wonder if the comment would apply to Stanford?

The overall argument for cloud computing is compelling. Of course the history of IT is a succession of swings of the pendulum between centralization and delocalization: mainframes, minis, PCs, client-server, “thin clients”, “The Network Is The Computer” (Sun’s slogan in the late eighties), smart clients, Web services and so on. But this latest swing seems destined to define much of the direction of computing for a while.

Interestingly, no speaker so far has addressed issues of how to program reliably for the cloud, even though cloud computing seems only to add orders of magnitude to the classical opportunities for messing up. Eiffel and contracts have a major role to play here.

More generally the opportunity to improve quality should not be lost. There is a widespread feeling (I don’t know of any systematic studies) that a non-negligible share of results generated by computational science are just bogus, the product of old Fortran programs built by generations of graduate students with little understanding of software principles. At the very least, moving to cloud computing should encourage the use of 21-th century tools, languages and methods. Availability on the cloud should also enhance a critical property of good scientific research: reproducibility.

Software engineering is remarkably absent from the list of scientific application areas that speaker after speaker listed for cloud computing. Maybe software engineering researchers are timid, and do not think of themselves as deserving large computing resources; consider, however, all the potential applications, for example in program verification and empirical software engineering. The cloud is a big part of our own research in verification; in particular the automated testing paradigm pioneered by AutoTest [3] fits ideally with the cloud and we are actively working in this direction.

Lazowska mentioned that development environments are the ultimate application of cloud computing. Martin Nordio at ETH has developed, with the help of Le Minh Duc, a Master’s student at Hanoi University of Technology, a cloud-based version of EiffelStudio: CloudStudio, which I will present in my talk at the conference tomorrow. I’ll write more about it in later posts; just one note for the moment: no one should ever be forced again to update or commit.

References

[1] Program of the Cloud Futures conference.

[2] Keynote by Ed Lazowska. You can see his slides here.

[3] Bertrand Meyer, Arno Fiva, Ilinca Ciupa, Andreas Leitner, Yi Wei, Emmanuel Stapf: Programs That Test Themselves. IEEE Computer, vol. 42, no. 9, pages 46-55, September 2009; online version here.

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SEAFOOD 2010

The next SEAFOOD (Software Engineering Advances For Offshore and Outsourced Development) conference will take place in Saint Petersburg, Russia, on 17 and 18 June 2010. The conference co-chairs are Andrey Terekhov from Saint Petersburg State University and Lanit-Tercom, and Martin Nordio from ETH are conference co-chairs. Mathai Joseph from Tata Consulting Services and I will be co-chairing the PC. The Call for Papers will be issued soon; information about this year’s conference at seafood.ethz.ch.

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