Archive for February 2012

New LASER proceedings

Springer has just published in the tutorial sub-series of Lecture Notes in Computer Science a new proceedings volume for the LASER summer school [1]. The five chapters are notes from the 2008, 2009 and 2010 schools (a previous volume [2] covered earlier schools). The themes range over search-based software engineering (Mark Harman and colleagues), replication of software engineering experiments (Natalia Juristo and Omar Gómez), integration of testing and formal analysis (Mauro Pezzè and colleagues), and, in two papers by our ETH group, Is branch coverage a good measure of testing effectiveness (with Yi Wei and Manuel Oriol — answer: not really!) and a formal reference for SCOOP (with Benjamin Morandi and Sebastian Nanz).

The idea of these LASER tutorial books — which are now a tradition, with the volume from the 2011 school currently in preparation — is to collect material from the presentations at the summer school, prepared by the lecturers themselves, sometimes in collaboration with some of the participants. Reading them is not quite as fun as attending the school, but it gives an idea.

The 2012 school is in full preparation, on the theme of “Advanced Languages for Software Engineering” and with once again an exceptional roster of speakers, or should I say an exceptional roster of exceptional speakers: Guido van Rossum (Python), Ivar Jacobson (from UML to Semat), Simon Peyton-Jones (Haskell), Roberto Ierusalimschy (Lua), Martin Odersky (Scala), Andrei Alexandrescu (C++ and D),Erik Meijer (C# and LINQ), plus me on the design and evolution of Eiffel.

The preparation of LASER 2012 is under way, with registration now open [3]; the school will take place from Sept. 2 to Sept. 8 and, like its predecessors, in the wonderful setting on the island of Elba, off the coast of Tuscany, with a very dense technical program but time for enjoying the beach, the amenities of a 4-star hotel and the many treasures of the island. On the other hand not everyone likes Italy, the sun, the Mediterranean etc.; that’s fine too, you can wait for the 2013 proceedings.


[1] Bertrand Meyer and Martin Nordio (eds): Empirical Software Engineering and Verification, International Summer Schools LASER 2008-2010, Elba Island, Italy, Revised Tutorial Lectures, Springer Verlag, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 7007, Springer-Verlag, 2012, see here.

[2] Peter Müller (ed.): Advanced Lectures on Software Engineering, LASER Summer School 2007-2008, Springer Verlag, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 7007, Springer-Verlag, 2012, see here.

[3] LASER summer school information and registration form,

VN:F [1.9.10_1130]
Rating: 10.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.10_1130]
Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)

ERC Advanced Investigator Grant: Concurrency Made Easy

In April we will be starting the  “Concurrency Made Easy” research project, the result of a just announced Advanced Investigator Grant from the European Research Council. Such ERC grants are awarded to a specific person, rather than a consortium of research organizations as in the usual EU funding scheme. The usual amount, which applies in my case, is 2.5 million euros (currently almost 3 .3 million dollars) over five years, on a specific theme. According to the ERC’s own description [1],

ERC Advanced Grants allow exceptional established research leaders of any nationality and any age to pursue ground-breaking, high-risk projects that open new directions in their respective research fields or other domains.

This is the most sought-after research funding instrument of the EU, with a success rate of about 12% [2], out of a group already preselected by the host institutions. What makes ERC Advanced Investigator Grants so coveted is the flexibility of the scheme (no constraints on the topic, light administrative baggage) and the trust that an award implies in a particular researcher and his ability to carry out advanced research.

The name of the CME project clearly signals its ambition: to turn concurrent programming into a normal, unheroic part of programming. Today adding concurrency to a program, usually in the form of multithreading, is very hard, complexity and risk of all kinds. Everyone is telling us that we must rethink programming, retrain programmers and revamp curricula to put the specific reasoning modes of concurrent programming at the center. I don’t think this can work; thinking concurrently is just too hard to become the default mode. Instead, we should adapt programming languages, theories and tools so that programmers can continue to apply the reasoning schemes that have proved so successful in classical programming, especially object-oriented programming with the benefit of Design by Contract.

The starting point is the SCOOP model, to which I started an introduction in an earlier article of this blog [3], with a sequel yet to come. SCOOP is a minimal extension to the O-O framework to support concurrency, yielding very simple (the S in the acronym) solutions to concurrent programming problems. As part of the CME project we plan to develop it in many different directions and establish a sound and effective formal basis.

I have put the project description — the scientific part of the actual proposal text accepted by the ERC — online [4].

In the next few weeks I will be publishing here specific announcements for the positions we are seeking to fill very quickly; they include postdocs, PhD students, and one research engineer. We are looking for candidates with excellent knowledge and practice of concurrency, Eiffel, formal techniques etc. The formal application procedure will be Web-based and is not in place yet but you can contact me if you fit the profile and are interested.

We can defeat the curse: concurrent programming (an obligatory condition of any path towards a successful future for information technology) does not have to be black magic. It can be made simple and efficient. Such is the challenge of the CME project.


[1] European Research Council: Advanced Grants, available here.

[2] European Research Council: Press release on 2011 Advanced Investigator Grants, 24 January 2012, available here.

[3] Concurrent Programming is Easy, article from this blog, available here.

[4] CME Advanced Investigator Grant project description, available here.

VN:F [1.9.10_1130]
Rating: 10.0/10 (4 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.10_1130]
Rating: +2 (from 2 votes)

R&D positions in software engineering

In the past couple of weeks, three colleagues separately sent me announcements of PhD and postdoc positions, asking me to circulate them. This blog is as good a place as any other (as a matter of fact when I asked Oge de Moor if it was appropriate  he replied: “Readers of your blog are just the kind of applicants we look for…” — I hope you appreciate the compliment). So here they are:

  • Daniel Jackson, for work on Alloy, see here. (“Our plan now is to take Alloy in new directions, and dramatically improve the usability and scalability of the analyzer. We are looking for someone who is excited by these possibilities and will be deeply involved not only in design and implementation but also in strategic planning. There are also opportunities to co-advise students and participate in research proposals.”)
  • University College London (Anthony Finkelstein), a position as lecturer, similar to assistant professor), see here. The title is “Lecturer in software testing” (which, by the way, seems a bit restrictive, as I am more familiar with an academic culture in which the general academic discipline is set, say software engineering or possibly software verification, rather than a narrow specialty, but I hope the scope can be broadened).
  • Semmle, Oge de Moor’s company, see here.

These are all excellent environments, so if you are very, very good, please consider applying. If you are very, very, very good don’t, as I am soon going to post a whole set of announcements for PhD and postdoc positions at ETH in connection with a large new grant.


VN:F [1.9.10_1130]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.10_1130]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

TOOLS 2012, “The Triumph of Objects”, Prague in May: Call for Workshops

Workshop proposals are invited for TOOLS 2012, The Triumph of, to be held in Prague May 28 to June 1. TOOLS is a federated set of conferences:

  • TOOLS EUROPE 2012: 50th International Conference on Objects, Models, Components, Patterns.
  • ICMT 2012: 5th International Conference on Model Transformation.
  • Software Composition 2012: 10th International Conference.
  • TAP 2012: 6th International Conference on Tests And Proofs.
  • MSEPT 2012: International Conference on Multicore Software Engineering, Performance, and Tools.

Workshops, which are normally one- or two-day long, provide organizers and participants with an opportunity to exchange opinions, advance ideas, and discuss preliminary results on current topics. The focus can be on in-depth research topics related to the themes of the TOOLS conferences, on best practices, on applications and industrial issues, or on some combination of these.


Submission proposal implies the organizers’ commitment to organize and lead the workshop personally if it is accepted. The proposal should include:

  •  Workshop title.
  • Names and short bio of organizers .
  • Proposed duration.
  •  Summary of the topics, goals and contents (guideline: 500 words).
  •  Brief description of the audience and community to which the workshop is targeted.
  • Plans for publication if any.
  • Tentative Call for Papers.

Acceptance criteria are:

  • Organizers’ track record and ability to lead a successful workshop.
  •  Potential to advance the state of the art.
  • Relevance of topics and contents to the topics of the TOOLS federated conferences.
  •  Timeliness and interest to a sufficiently large community.

Please send the proposals to me (Bertrand.Meyer AT, with a Subject header including the words “TOOLS WORKSHOP“. Feel free to contact me if you have any question.


  •  Workshop proposal submission deadline: 17 February 2012.
  • Notification of acceptance or rejection: as promptly as possible and no later than February 24.
  • Workshops: 28 May to 1 June 2012.


VN:F [1.9.10_1130]
Rating: 7.3/10 (3 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.10_1130]
Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)