Archive for the ‘Agile’ Category.

The end of software engineering and the last methodologist

(Reposted from the CACM blog [*].)

Software engineering was never a popular subject. It started out as “programming methodology”, evoking the image of bearded middle-aged men telling you with a Dutch, Swiss-German or Oxford accent to repent and mend your ways. Consumed (to paraphrase Mark Twain) by the haunting fear that someone, somewhere, might actually enjoy coding.

That was long ago. With a few exceptions including one mentioned below, to the extent that anyone still studies programming methodology, it’s in the agile world, where the decisive argument is often “I always say…”. (Example from a consultant’s page:  “I always tell teams: `I’d like a [user] story to be small, to fit in one iteration but that isn’t always the way.’“) Dijkstra did appeal to gut feeling but he backed it through strong conceptual arguments.

The field of software engineering, of which programming methodology is today just a small part, has enormously expanded in both depth and width. Conferences such as ICSE and ESEC still attract a good crowd, the journals are buzzing, the researchers are as enthusiastic as ever about their work, but… am I the only one to sense frustration? It is not clear that anyone outside of the community is interested. The world seems to view software engineering as something that everyone in IT knows because we all develop software or manage people who develop software. In the 2017 survey of CS faculty hiring in the U.S., software engineering accounted, in top-100 Ph.D.-granting universities, for 3% of hires! (In schools that stop at the master’s level, the figure is 6%; not insignificant, but not impressive either given that these institutions largely train future software engineers.) From an academic career perspective, the place to go is obviously  “Artificial Intelligence, Data Mining, and Machine Learning”, which in those top-100 universities got 23% of hires.

Nothing against our AI colleagues; I always felt “AI winter” was an over-reaction [1], and they are entitled to their spring. Does it mean software engineering now has to go into a winter of its own? That is crazy. Software engineering is more important than ever. The recent Atlantic  “software apocalypse” article (stronger on problems than solutions) is just the latest alarm-sounding survey. Or, for just one recent example, see the satellite loss in Russia [2] (juicy quote, which you can use the next time you teach a class about the challenges of software testing: this revealed a hidden problem in the algorithm, which was not uncovered in decades of successful launches of the Soyuz-Frigate bundle).

Such cases, by the way, illustrate what I would call the software professor’s dilemma, much more interesting in my opinion than the bizarre ethical brain-teasers (you see what I mean, trolley levers and the like) on which people in philosophy departments spend their days: is it ethical for a professor of software engineering, every morning upon waking up, to go to in the hope that a major software-induced disaster has occurred,  finally legitimizing the profession? The answer is simple: no, that is not ethical. Still, if you have witnessed the actual state of ordinary software development, it is scary to think about (although not to wish for) all the catastrophes-in-waiting that you suspect are lying out there just waiting for the right circumstances .

So yes, software engineering is more relevant than ever, and so is programming methodology. (Personal disclosure: I think of myself as the very model of a modern methodologist [3], without a beard or a Dutch accent, but trying to carry, on today’s IT scene, the torch of the seminal work of the 1970s and 80s.)

What counts, though, is not what the world needs; it is what the world believes it needs. The world does not seem to think it needs much software engineering. Even when software causes a catastrophe, we see headlines for a day or two, and then nothing. Radio silence. I have argued to the point of nausea, including at least four times in this blog (five now), for a simple rule that would require a public auditing of any such event; to quote myself: airline transportation did not become safer by accident but by accidents. Such admonitions fall on deaf ears. As another sign of waning interest, many people including me learned much of what they understand of software engineering through the ACM Risks Forum, long a unique source of technical information on software troubles. The Forum still thrives, and still occasionally reports about software engineering issues, but most of the traffic is about privacy and security (with a particular fondness for libertarian rants against any reasonable privacy rule that the EU passes). Important topics indeed, but where do we go for in-depth information about what goes wrong with software?

Yet another case in point is the evolution of programming languages. Language creation is abuzz again with all kinds of fancy new entrants. I can think of one example (TypeScript) in which the driving force is a software engineering goal: making Web programs safer, more scalable and more manageable by bringing some discipline into the JavaScript world. But that is the exception. The arguments for many of the new languages tend to be how clever they are and what expressive new constructs they introduce. Great. We need new ideas. They would be even more convincing if they addressed the old, boring problems of software engineering: correctness, robustness, extendibility, reusability.

None of this makes software engineering less important, or diminishes in the least the passion of those of us who have devoted our careers to the field. But it is time to don our coats and hats: winter is upon us.


[1] AI was my first love, thanks to Jean-Claude Simon at Polytechnique/Paris VI and John McCarthy at Stanford.

[2] Thanks to Nikolay Shilov for alerting me to this information. The text is in Russian but running it through a Web translation engine (maybe this link will work) will give the essentials.

[3] This time borrowing a phrase from James Noble.

[*] I am reposting these CACM blog articles rather than just putting a link, even though as a software engineer I do not like copy-paste. This is my practice so far, and it might change since it raises obvious criticism, but here are the reasons: (A) The audiences for the two blogs are, as experience shows, largely disjoint. (B) I like this site to contain a record of all my blog articles, regardless of what happens to other sites. (C) I can use my preferred style conventions.

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Devops (the concept, and a workshop announcement)

One of the most significant recent developments in software engineering is the concept of Devops*. Dismissing the idea as “just the latest buzzword” would be wrong. It may be a buzzword but it reflects a fundamental change in the way we structure system development; with web applications in particular the traditional distinctions between steps of development, V&V** and deployment fade out. If you are using Microsoft Word, you know or can easily find out the version number; but which version of your search engine are you using?

With the new flexibility indeed come new risks, as when a bug in the latest “devopsed”  version of Google Docs caused me to lose a whole set of complex diagrams irretrievably; an earlier article on this blog (“The Cloud and Its Risks“, October 2010) told the story.

In the new world of continuous integrated development/V&V/deployment, software engineering principles are more necessary than ever, but their application has to undergo a profound adaptation.

With Jean-Michel Bruel (Toulouse), Elisabetta Di Nitto (Milan) and Manuel Mazzara (Innopolis), we are organizing a workshop on the topic, DEVOPS 18, on 5-6 March 2018 near Toulouse. The Call for Papers is available here, with Springer LNCS proceedings. The submission deadline is January 15, but for that date a 2-page extended abstract is sufficient. I hope that the event will help the community get a better grasp of the software engineering techniques and practices applicable to this new world of software development.


*I know, it’s supposed to be DevOps (I am not a great fan of upper case in the middle of words).
** Validation & Verification.

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New session of online Agile course starts now

Just about a year ago I posted this announcement about my just released Agile course:

In spite of all the interest in both agile methods and MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) there are few courses on agile methods; I know only of some specialized MOOCs focused on a particular language or method.

I produced for EdX, with the help of Marco Piccioni, a new MOOC entitled Agile Software Development. It starts airing today and is supported by exercises and quizzes. The course uses some of the material from my Agile book.

The course is running again! You can find it on EdX here.

Such online courses truly “run”: they are not just canned videos but include exercises and working material on which you can get feedback.

Like the book (“Agile: The Good, the Hype and the Ugly“, Springer), the course is a tutorial on agile methods, presenting an unbiased analysis of their benefits and limits.

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Feature interactions, continued

Microsoft Office tools offer  features for (1) spelling correction and (2) multi-language support. They are not very good at working together, another example of the perils of feature interaction.

Spelling correction will by default
when misspelled, but in the case of common misspellings known to the tools it will simply correct words without bothering the user. For example if you type “bagage” it will change it silently to “baggage”. This feature can be turned off, and the list of known misspellings can be edited, but most people use the defaults, as I am assuming here.

Multi-language support enables you to “install” several languages. Then when you type a text it will after a few words guess the relevant language. From then on it can  apply the proper spell checks and corrections.

These features are both useful, and by and large they both work. (The second one is not always reliable. I regularly end up, particularly in Microsoft Word, with entire paragraphs underlined in red because for some inscrutable reason the tool assigns them the wrong language. In such cases you must tell it manually what language it should apply.)

Their combination can lead to funny results. Assume your default language is English but you also have French installed, and you are typing an email in French under Outlook. Your email will say “Le bagage est encore dans l’avion”, meaning “The baggage is still in the plane”. The word “baggage” has one more “g” in English than in French. You start typing  “Le bagage”, but because at that point the tool assumes English it corrects it silently:


Next you type “est encore”:


The  word “est” (is) gets flagged because (unlike “encore”, here meaning “still”) it does not exist in English. When you add the next word, “dans” (in), the tool is still assuming an English text, so it flags it too:


Now you type “l” and when you add the apostrophe, you can almost hear a “silly me, I see now, that’s French!”. Outlook  switches languages and unflags the previously flagged words, removing the red squiggle under the ones that are correct in French:


But that is too late for “baggage”: the automatic respelling of “bagage”, coming from the default assumption that the text was in English, no longer makes sense now that we know it is in French. So the word gets flagged as a misspelling. You have to go back and correct it yourself. That is frustrating, since you typed the correct spelling in the first place (“bagage”), and it is the tool that messed it up.

This bug hits me often. It is indeed a bug, which can introduce misspellings into a text when the user typed it correctly. When the tool recognizes that the text is in another language than the one assumed so far, and performs a second pass over the part already analyzed, it should reconsider both the words previously flagged as misspellings but also those previously corrected. There is no justification for doing one and not the other.

Among the world’s most momentous problems, this one does not rank very high. It is only a small annoyance, and only a tiny set of people will ever notice it. But it provides another illustration of how tricky it is to go from good individual features to a good overall design.


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Agile MOOC starts this week

In spite of all the interest in both agile methods and MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) there are few courses on agile methods; I know only of some specialized MOOCs focused on a particular language or method.

I produced for EdX, with the help of Marco Piccioni, a new MOOC entitled Agile Software Development. It starts airing today and is supported by exercises and quizzes. The course uses some of the material from my Agile book.

Registration is free and open to anyone at this address.

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Agile methods: follow-up webinar and discussion

After my earlier ACM Webinar on Agile Methods! The Good, the Hype and the Ugly there were so many questions from the audience, left unanswered for lack of time, that a follow-up session has been set up. It will take place tomorrow (Friday, 27 March 2015) at noon New York time (18 Paris/Berlin/Zurich, 5 PM London etc.). Like the first one it is free and you can find the registration information here.

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Understanding and assessing Agile: free ACM webinar next Wednesday

ACM is offering this coming Wednesday a one-hour webinar entitled Agile Methods: The Good, the Hype and the Ugly. It will air on February 18 at 1 PM New York time (10 AM West Coast, 18 London, 19 Paris, see here for more cities). The event is free and the registration link is here.

The presentation is based on my recent book with an almost identical title [1]. It will be a general discussion of agile methods, analyzing both their impressive contributions to software engineering and their excesses, some of them truly damaging. It is often hard to separate the beneficial from the indifferent and the plain harmful, because most of the existing presentations are of the hagiographical kind, gushing in admiration of the sacred word. A bit of critical distance does not hurt.

As you can see from the Amazon page, the first readers (apart from a few dissenters, not a surprise for such a charged topic) have relished this unprejudiced, no-nonsense approach to the presentation of agile methods.

Another characteristic of the standard agile literature is that it exaggerates the contrast with classic software engineering. This slightly adolescent attitude is not helpful; in reality, many of the best agile ideas are the direct continuation of the best classic ideas, even when they correct or adapt them, a normal phenomenon in technology evolution. In the book I tried to re-place agile ideas in this long-term context, and the same spirit will also guide the webinar. Ideological debates are of little interest to software practitioners; what they need to know is what works and what does not.


[1] Bertrand Meyer, Agile! The Good, the Hype and the Ugly, Springer, 2014, see Amazon page here, publisher’s page here and my own book page here.

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Accurately Analyzing Agility

Book announcement:

Agile! The Good, the Hype and the Ugly
Bertrand Meyer
Springer, 2014 (just appeared)
Book page: here.
Amazon page: here.
Publisher’s page: here

A few years ago I became fascinated with agile methods: with the unique insights they include; with the obvious exaggerations and plainly wrong advice they also promote; and perhaps most of all with the constant intermingling of these two extremes.

I decided to play the game seriously: I read a good part of the agile literature, including all the important books; I sang the song, became a proud certified Scrum Master; I applied many agile techniques in my own work.

The book mentioned above is the result of that study and experience. It is both a tutorial and a critique.

The tutorial component was, I felt, badly needed. Most of the agile presentations I have seen are partisan texts, exhorting you to genuflect and adopt some agile method as the secret to a better life. Such preaching has a role but professionals know there is no magic in software development.  Agile! describes the key agile ideas objectively, concretely, and as clearly as I could present them. It does not introduce them in a vacuum, like the many agile books that pretend software engineering did not exist before (except for a repulsive idea, the dreaded “waterfall”). Instead, it relates them to many other concepts and results of software engineering, to which they bring their own additions and improvements.

Unfortunately, not all the additions are improvements. Up to now, the field has largely been left (with the exception of Boehm’s and Turner’s 2005 “Guide for the Perplexed“) to propaganda pieces and adoring endorsements. I felt that software developers would benefit more from a reasoned critical analysis. All the more so that agile methods are a remarkable mix of the best and the worst; the book carefully weeds out — in the terminology of the title — the ugly from the hype and the truly good.

Software developers and managers need to know about the “ugly”: awful agile advice that is guaranteed to harm your project. The “hype” covers ideas that have been widely advertised as shining agile contributions but have little relevance to the core goals of software development. The reason it was so critical to identify agile ideas belonging to these two categories is that they detract from the “good”, some of it remarkably good. I would not have devoted a good part of the last five years to studying agile methods if I did not feel they included major contributions to software engineering. I also found that some of these contributions do not get, in the agile literature itself, the explanations and exposure they deserve; I made sure they got their due in the book. An example is the “closed-window rule”, a simple but truly brilliant idea, of immediate benefit to any project.

Software methodology is a difficult topic, on which we still have a lot to learn. I expect some healthy discussions, but I hope readers will appreciate the opportunity to discuss agile ideas in depth for the greater benefit of quality software development.

I also made a point of writing a book that (unlike my last two) is short: 190 pages, including preface, index and everything else.

The table of contents follows; more details and sample chapters can be found on the book page listed above.

     1.1 VALUES
          Organizational principles
          Technical principles
     1.3 ROLES
     1.4 PRACTICES
          Organizational practices
          Technical practices
     1.5 ARTIFACTS
          Virtual artifacts
          Material artifacts
          Not new and not good
          New and not good
          Not new but good
          New and good!

          Proof by anecdote
          When writing beats speaking
          Discovering the gems
          Agile texts: reader beware!
          Proof by anecdote
          Slander by association
          Unverifiable claims
          Postscript: you have been ill-served by the software industry!

          Requirements engineering techniques
          Agile criticism of upfront requirements
          The waste criticism
          The change criticism
          The domain and the machine
          Is design separate from implementation?
          Agile methods and design
          CMMI in plain English
          The Personal Software Process
          CMMI/PSP and agile methods
          An agile maturity scale

     4.3 A USABLE LIST
          Put the customer at the center
          Let the team self-organize
          Maintain a sustainable pace
          Develop minimal software
          Accept change
          Develop iteratively
          Treat tests as a key resource
          Do not start any new development until all tests pass
          Test first
          Express requirements through scenarios

     5.1 MANAGER
     5.3 TEAM
     5.5 CUSTOMER

     6.1 SPRINT
          Sprint basics
          The closed-window rule
          Sprint: an assessment
     6.6 OPEN SPACE
          The code ownership debate
          Collective ownership and cross-functionality

          Pair programming concepts
          Pair programming versus mentoring
          Mob programming
          Pair programming: an assessment
          The refactoring concept
          Benefits and limits of refactoring
          Incidental and essential changes
          Combining a priori and a posteriori approaches
          The TDD method of software development
          An assessment of TFD and TDD

     8.1 CODE
     8.2 TESTS
     8.5 VELOCITY
     8.12 IMPEDIMENT

          The fox and the hedgehog
          Lean Software’s Big Idea
          Lean Software’s principles
          Lean Software: an assessment
          XP’s Big Idea
          XP: the unadulterated source
          Key XP techniques
          Extreme Programming: an assessment
     9.4 SCRUM
          Scrum’s Big Idea
          Key Scrum practices
          Scrum: an assessment
     9.5 CRYSTAL
          Crystal’s Big Idea
          Crystal principles
          Crystal: an assessment


          Deprecation of upfront tasks
          User stories as a basis for requirements
          Feature-based development and ignorance of dependencies
          Rejection of dependency tracking tools
          Rejection of traditional manager tasks
          Rejection of upfront generalization
          Embedded customer
          Coach as a separate role
          Test-driven development
          Deprecation of documents
     11.2 THE HYPED
     11.3 THE GOOD


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Agile book announced

My book “Agile! The Good, the Hype and the Ugly” will be published in a few weeks by Springer. The announced date is April 30 and there is a preview Amazon page: here.

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Doing it right or doing it over?

(Adapted from an article in the Communications of the ACM blog.)

I have become interested in agile methods because they are all the rage now in industry and, upon dispassionate examination, they appear to be a pretty amazing mix of good and bad ideas. I am finishing a book that tries to sort out the nuggets from the gravel [1].

An interesting example is the emphasis on developing a system by successive increments covering expanding slices of user functionality. This urge to deliver something that can actually be shown — “Are we shipping yet?” — is excellent. It is effective in focusing the work of a team, especially once the foundations of the software have been laid. But does it have to be the only way of working? Does it have to exclude the time-honored engineering practice of building the infrastructure first? After all, when a building gets constructed, it takes many months before any  “user functionality” becomes visible.

In a typical exhortation [2], the Poppendiecks argue that:

The right the first time approach may work for well-structured problems, but the try-it, test-it, fix-it approach is usually the better approach for ill-structured problems.

Very strange. It is precisely ill-structured problems that require deeper analysis before you jump in into wrong architectural decisions which may require complete rework later on. Doing prototypes to try possible solutions can be a great way to evaluate potential solutions, but a prototype is an experiment, something quite different from an increment (an early version of the future system).

One of the problems with the agile literature is that its enthusiastic admonitions to renounce standard software engineering practices are largely based on triumphant anecdotes of successful projects. I am willing to believe all these anecdotes, but they are only anecdotes. In the present case systematic empirical evidence does not seem to support the agile view. Boehm and Turner [3] write:

Experience to date indicates that low-cost refactoring cannot be depended upon as projects scale up.


The only sources of empirical data we have encountered come from less-expert early adopters who found that even for small applications the percentage of refactoring and defect-correction effort increases with [the size of requirements].

They do not cite references here, and I am not aware of any empirical study that definitely answers the question. But their argument certainly fits my experience. In software as in engineering of any kind, experimenting with various solutions is good, but it is critical to engage in the appropriate Big Upfront Thinking to avoid starting out with the wrong decisions. Some of the worst project catastrophes I have seen were those in which the customer or manager was demanding to see something that worked right away — “it doesn’t matter if it’s not the whole thing, just demonstrate a piece of it! — and criticized the developers who worked on infrastructure that did not produce immediately visible results (in other words, were doing their job of responsible software professionals). The inevitable result: feel-good demos throughout the project, reassured customer, and nothing to deliver at the end because the difficult problems have been left to rot. System shelved and never to be heard of again.

When the basis has been devised right, perhaps with nothing much to show for months, then it becomes critical to insist on regular visible releases. Doing it prematurely is just sloppy engineering.

The problem here is extremism. Software engineering is a difficult balance between conflicting criteria. The agile literature’s criticism of teams that spend all their time on design or on foundations and never deliver any usable functionality is unfortunately justified. It does not mean that we have to fall into the other extreme and discard upfront thinking.

In the agile tradition of argument by anecdote, here is an extract from James Surowiecki’s  “Financial Page” article in last month’s New Yorker. It’s not about software but about the current Boeing 787 “Dreamliner” debacle:

Determined to get the Dreamliners to customers quickly, Boeing built many of them while still waiting for the Federal Aviation Administration to certify the plane to fly; then it had to go back and retrofit the planes in line with the FAA’s requirements. “If the saying is check twice and build once, this was more like build twice and check once”, [an industry analyst] said to me. “With all the time and cost pressures, it was an alchemist’s recipe for trouble.”

(Actually, the result is “build twice and check twice”, or more, since every time you rebuild you must also recheck.) Does that ring a bell?

Erich Kästner’s ditty about reaching America, cited in a previous article [5], is once again the proper commentary here.


[1] Bertrand Meyer: Agile! The Good, the Hype and the Ugly, Springer, 2013, to appear.

[2] Mary and Tom Poppendieck: Lean Software Development — An Agile Toolkit, Addison-Wesley, 2003.

[3] Barry W. Boehm and Richard Turner: Balancing Agility with Discipline — A Guide for the Perplexed, Addison-Wesley, 2004. (Second citation slightly abridged.)

[4] James Surowiecki, in the New Yorker, 4 February 2013, available here.

[5] Hitting on America, article from this blog, 5 December 2012, available here.

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