Archive for the ‘User interface design’ Category.

When pictures lie

 

One of the most improvable characteristics of scientific papers is the graphical presentation of numerical data. It is sad to see that thirty years after Tufte published the first edition of his masterpiece [1] many authors are still including grossly inaccurate graphics. Sadder still when the authors are professional graphists, who should know better. Take this chart [2] from the last newsletter of Migros, Switzerland’s largest supermarket chain. To convince Swiss people that they should not worry about their food bills, it displays the ratio of food expenses to revenue in various countries. There would be many good ways to represent this information graphically, but someone thought it clever to draw variable-size coins of the respective currencies. According to the text, “the bigger the circle, the larger the income’s share devoted to food“.

Just a minor problem: the visual effect is utterly misleading. Taking three examples from the numbers given, the ratio is roughly 10% for Switzerland, 30% for Russia, 40% for Morocco. And, sure enough,  compared to the Swiss coin in the figure, the Russian coin is about three times bigger and the Moroccan coin four times… in diameter! What the eye sees, of course, is the area. Since the area varies as the square of the diameter, one gets the impression that Russians spend nine times, not three, and Moroccans sixteen times, not four, as much as the Swiss.

To convey the correct suggestion, the diameter of the Russian coin should have been about 73% larger than the Swiss coin’s diameter (the square root of three is about 1.73) , and the diameter of the Moroccan coin twice larger, that is to say half of what it is.

The impression is particularly misleading for countries where the ratio, unlike in Russia or Morocco, is close to Switzerland’s. Most interestingly, although no doubt by accident, for neighboring countries, where Swiss people are prone to go shopping in search of a bargain, a practice that possibly does not enthuse Migros. The extra percentage devoted to food (using this time  no longer rough approximations but precise values from the figures given in the Migros page) is 4% for Austria (10.9 ratio vs Switzerland’s 10.2), 8% for Germany (11.1), 30% for France (13.3) and  43% for Italy (14.6). But if you look at the picture the circles suggest much bigger differences; for example the Italian circle is obviously computed from the ratio of the squares, 14.62 / 10.62, showing an increase of 104%. In other words, Italians proportionally devote to food a little over two-fifths more  than the Swiss, but the graph suggests they spend twice as much.

On the premise that one should not ascribe to malevolence what can be explained by ignorance, I hope the Migros graphists will get a copy of Tufte’s book for their future endeavors.

Read Tufte too if you want the pictures in your papers to be not just attractive but accurate.

References

[1] Edward R. Tufte: The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, Graphics Press, second edition, 2001. See his site here.

[2] “How much do we spend to feed ourselves?” on the Migros site, available here for the French version (replace “fr” in the URL by “de” for German and “it” for Italian, I did not see an English version). Click on the figure for a readable version.

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Adult entertainment

 

I should occasionally present examples of the strange reasons people sometimes invoke for not using Eiffel. In an earlier article [1] I gave the basic idea common to all these reasons, but there are many variants, in the general style “I am responsible for IT policy and purchases for IBM, the US Department of Defense and Nikke, and was about to sign the PO for the triple site license when I noticed that an article about Eiffel was published in 1997. How dare you! I had a tooth removed that year and it hurt a lot. I would really have liked to use Eiffel but you just made it impossible“.

While going through old email I found one of these carefully motivated strategic policy decisions: a missing “L” in a class name. Below is, verbatim [2], a message posted on the EiffelStudio developers list in 2006, and my answer. Also provides an interesting glimpse of what supposedly grown-up people find it worthwhile to spend their days on.

Original message

From: es-devel-bounces@origo.ethz.ch [mailto:es-devel-bounces@origo.ethz.ch] On Behalf Of Peter Gummer
Sent: Tuesday, 29 August, 2006 14:01
To: es-devel@origo.ethz.ch
Subject: [Es-devel] Misspelling as a naming convention
From: es-devel-bounces@origo.ethz.ch [mailto:es-devel-bounces@origo.ethz.ch] On Behalf Of Peter Gummer

Today I submitted a problem report that one of the EiffelVision classes has misspelt “tabbable” as “tabable“. Manu replied that the EiffelVision naming convention is that class or feature names ending in “able” will not double the preceding consonant, regardless of whether this results in wrong spelling.

Looking at the latest Es-changes Digest email, I see various changes implementing this naming convention. For example, the comment for revision 63043 is, “Changed from controllable to controlable to meet naming convention‘.

This is lunacy! “Controlable” (implying the existence of some verb “to controle“) might look quite ok to French eyes, but it looks utterly unprofessional to me. It does have a sort of Chaucerian, Middle English, pre-Gutenberg charm I suppose. Is this part of a plot for a Seconde Invasion Normande of the Langue Anglaise?

We are about to embark on some GUI work. Although we are probably going to use .NET WinForms, EiffelVision was a possible choice. But bad spelling puts me in a bad mood. I’d be very reluctant to work with EiffelVision because of this ridiculous naming convention.

– Peter Gummer

Answer

From: Bertrand Meyer
Sent: Wednesday, 30 August, 2006 00:52
To: Peter Gummer
Cc: es-devel@origo.ethz.ch
Subject: Re: [Es-devel] Misspelling as a naming convention

This has nothing to do with French. If anything, French practices the doubling of consonants before a suffix more than English does; an example (extracted from reports of users’ attitudes towards EiffelVision) is English “passionate“, French “passionné“. For the record, there’s no particular French dominance in the Eiffel development team, either at Eiffel Software or elsewhere. The recent discussion on EiffelVision’s “-able” class names involved one native English speaker out of three people, invalidating at the 33% level Kristen Nygaard’s observation that the language of science is English as spoken by foreigners.

The problem in English is that the rules defining which consonants should be doubled before a suffix such as “able” are not obvious. See for example this page from the University of Ottawa:

Double the final consonant before a suffix beginning with a vowel if both of the following are true: the consonant ends a stressed syllable or a one-syllable word, and the consonant is preceded by a single vowel.

Now close your eyes and repeat this from memory. I am sure that won’t be hard because you knew the rule all along, but can we expect this from all programmers using EiffelVision?

Another Web page , from a school in Oxfordshire, England, says:

Rule: Double the last consonant when adding a vowel suffix to a single syllable word ending in one vowel and one consonant.

Note that this is not quite the same rule; it doesn’t cover multi-syllable words with the stress (tonic accent) on the last syllable; and it would suggest “GROUPPABLE” (“group” is a one-syllable word ending in one vowel and one consonant), whereas the first rule correctly prescribes “GROUPABLE“. But apparently this is what is being taught to Oxfordshire pupils, whom we should stand ready to welcome as Eiffel programmers in a few years.

Both rules yield “TRANSFERABLE” because the stress is on the first syllable of “transfer“. But various dictionaries we have consulted also list “TRANSFERRABLE” and “TRANSFERRIBLE“.

As another example consider “FORMATING“. Both rules suggest a single “t“. The Solaris spell checker indeed rejects the form with two “t“s and accepts the version with one; but — a case of Unix-Windows incompatibility that seems so far to have escaped the attention of textbook authors — Microsoft Word does the reverse! In fact in default mode if you type “FORMATING” it silently corrects it to “FORMATTING“. It’s interesting in this example to note a change of tonic accent between the original and derived words: “fórmat” (both noun and verb) but “formáting“. Maybe the Word convention follows the “Ottawa” rule but by considering the stress in the derivation rather than the root? There might be a master’s thesis topic in this somewhere.

Both rules imply “MIXXABLE” and “FIXXABLE“, but we haven’t found a dictionary that accepts either of these forms.

Such rules cannot cover all cases anyway (they are “UNFATHOMMABLE“) because “consonant” vs “vowel” is a lexical distinction that doesn’t reflect the subtleties of English pronunciation. For example either rule would lead to “DRAWWABLE” because the word “draw” ends with “w“, a letter that you’ll find everywhere characterized as a consonant. Lexically it is a consonant, but phonetically it is sometimes a consonant and sometimes not, in particular at the end of a word. In “Wow“, the first “w” is a consonant, but not the second one. A valid rule would need to take into account not only spelling but also pronunciation. This is probably the reason behind the examples involving words ending in “x“: phonetically “X” can be considered two consonants, “KS“. But then the rule becomes more tricky, forcing the inquirer, who is understandably getting quite “PERPLEXXED” at this stage, to combine lexical and phonetic reasoning in appropriate doses.

No wonder then a page from the Oxford Dictionaries site states:

One of the most common types of spelling error is a mistake over whether a word is spelled with a double or a single consonant.

and goes on to list many examples.

You can find a list of of words ending in “ablehere . Here are a few cases involving derivations from a word ending with “p“:

Single consonant
DEVELOPABLE
GRASPABLE
GROUPABLE
HELPABLE
KEEPABLE
REAPABLE
RECOUPABLE

Doubled consonant
DIPPABLE
DROPPABLE (but: DRAPABLE)
FLOPPABLE
MAPPABLE
RECAPPABLE (but: CAPABLE)
RIPPABLE (but: ROPABLE)
SHIPPABLE
SKIPPABLE
STOPPABLE
STRIPPABLE
TIPPABLE

There are also differences between British and American usage.

True, the “Ottawa” rule could be amended to take into account words ending in “w“, “x“, “h” and a few other letters, and come reasonably close to matching dictionary practice. But should programmers have to remember all this? Will they?

Since we are dealing in part with artificial words, there is also some doubt as to what constitutes a “misspelt” word as you call it (or a “misspelled” one as Eiffel conventions — based on American English — would have it). Applying the rule yields “MAPPABLE“, which is indeed found in dictionaries. But in the world of graphics we have the term “bitmap“, where the stress is on the first syllable. The rule then yields “BITMAPABLE“. That’s suspicious but “GOOGLABLE“; a search produces 31 “BITMAPPABLE” and two “BITMAPABLE“, one of which qualified by “(Is that a word?)”. So either EiffelVision uses something that looks inconsistent (“BITMAPABLE” vs “MAPPABLE“) but follows the rule; or we decide for consistency.

In our view this case can be generalized. The best convention is the one that doesn’t require programmers to remember delicate and sometimes fuzzy rules of English spelling, but standardizes on a naming convention that will be as easy to remember as possible. To achieve this goal the key is consistency. A simple rule for EiffelVision classes is:

  • For an “-able” name derived from a word ending with “e“, drop the “e“: REUSABLE. There seems to be no case of words ending with another vowel.
  • If the name is derived from a word ending with a consonant, just add “able“: CONTROLABLE, TOOLTIPABLE, GROUPABLE.

Some of these might look strange the first couple of times but from then on you will remember the convention.

While we are flattered that EiffelVision should be treated as literature, we must admit that there are better recommendations for beach reading, and that Eiffel is not English (or French).

The above rule is just a convention and someone may have a better suggestion.

With best regards,

— Bertrand Meyer, Ian King, Emmanuel Stapf

Reference and note

[1] Habit, happiness and programming languages, article in this blog, 22 October 2012, see here.

[2] I checked the URLs, found that two pages have disappeared since 2006, and replaced them with others having the same content. The formatting (fonts, some of the indentation) is added. Peter Gummer asked me to make sure that his name always appears with two “m“.

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Never design a language

It is a common occurrence in software development. Someone says: “We should design a language”. The usual context is that some part of the development requires a rich functionality set, and it appears appropriate to provide a flexible solution through a specialized language. As an example, in the development of an airline’s frequent flyer program on which I once worked the suggestion came to design a “Flyer Award Language” , with instructions appropriate for that application domain: record a trip, redeem an award, provide a statement of available miles and so on. A common term for such notations is DSL, for Domain-Specific Language.

Designing a language in such a context is almost always a bad idea (and I am not sure why I wrote “almost”). Languages are endless objects of discussion, usually on the least important aspects, which are also the most visible and those on which everyone has a strong opinion: concrete syntactic properties. People might pretend otherwise (“let’s not get bogged down on syntax, this is just one possible form”) but syntax is what the discussions will get bogged down to — keywords or symbols, this order or that order of operands, one instruction with several variants vs. several instructions… — at the expense of discussing the fundamental issues of functionality.

Worse yet, even if a language will be part of the solution it is usually just one facet to the solution. As was already explained in detail in [1], any useful functionality set will naturally be useful through several interfaces: a textual notation with concrete syntax may be one of them, but other possible ones include an API (Abstract Program Interface) for use from other software elements, a Graphical User Interface, a web user interface, yet another for web services (typically WSDL or some other XML or JSON format).

In such cases, starting with a concrete textual language is pretty silly, since it cannot yield the others directly (it would have to be parsed and further analyzed, which does not make sense). Of all the kinds of interface listed, the most fundamental one is the API: it describes the raw functionality, excluding any choice of syntax but including, thanks to contracts, elements of semantics. For example, a class AWARD in our frequent flyer application might include the feature


             redeem_for_upgrade (c: CUSTOMER; f : FLIGHT)
                                     — Upgrade c to next class of service on f.
                       require
                                    c /= holder
implies holder.allowed_substitute (c)
                                    f.permitted_for_upgrade
(Current)
                                    c.booked
( f )
                       
ensure
                                    c.class_of_service
( f ) =  old c.class_of_service ( f ) + 1

There is of course no implementation as this declaration only specifies an interface, but it says what needs to be said: to redeem the award for an upgrade, the intended customer must be either the holder of the award or an allowed substitute; the flight must be available for an upgrade with the current award (including the availability of enough miles); the intended customer must already be booked on the flight; and the upgrade will be for the next class of service.

These details are the kind of things that need to be discussed and agreed before the API is finalized. Then one can start discussing about a textual form (a DSL), a graphical interface, a web services interface. They all consist of relatively simple layers to be superimposed on a solidly defined and precisely specified basis. Once you have that basis, you can have all the fun you like arguing over everyone’s favorite forms of concrete syntax; it cannot hurt the project any more. Having these discussions early, at the expense of the more fundamental issues, is a great danger.

One of the key rules for successful software construction — as for many other ventures of course, especially in science and technology — is to distinguish the essential from the auxiliary, and consequently to devote proper attention to the essential issues while avoiding disputations of auxiliary issues. To define functionality, API is essential; language is auxiliary.

So when should you design a language? Never. Well, hardly ever.

Reference

[1] Bertrand Meyer: Introduction to the Theory of Programming Languages, Prentice Hall, 1990.

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Ado About The Resource That Was (Not)

 

After a few weeks of use, Microsoft Outlook tends in my experience to go into a kind of thrashing mode where the user interface no longer quite functions as it should, although to the tool’s credit it does not lose information. Recently I have been getting pop-up warnings such as

 

A required resource was

 

A required resource was what? The message reminded me of an episode in a long-ago game of Scrabble, in which I proposed ADOABOUT as a word. “Ado about what? ”, the other players asked, and were not placated by my answer.

The message must have been trying to say  that a required resource was missing, or not found, but at the time of getting the final detail Outlook must have run out of UI resources and hence could not summon the needed text string. Not surprising, since running out of resources is precisely what caused the message to appear, in a valiant attempt to tell the user what is going on. (Valiant but not that useful: if you are not a programmer on the Outlook development team but just a customer trying to read email, it is not absolutely obvious how the message, even with the missing part, helps you.) The irony in the example is that the title bar suggests the problem arose in connection with trying to display the “Social Connector” area, a recent Outlook feature which I have never used. (Social connector? Wasn’t the deal about getting into computer science in the first place that for the rest of your life you’d be spared the nuisance of social connections? One can no longer trust anything nowadays.)

We can sympathize with whoever wrote the code. The Case Of The Resource That Was (Not) is an example of a general programming problem which we may call Space Between Your Back And Wall  or SBYBAW:  when you have your back against the wall, there is not much maneuvering space left.

A fairly difficult case of the SBYBAW problem arises in garbage collection, for example for object-oriented languages. A typical mark-and-sweep garbage collector must traverse the entire object structure to remove all the objects that have not been marked as reachable from the stack. The natural way to write a graph traversal algorithm is recursive: visit the roots; then recursively traverse their successors, flagging visited objects in some way to avoid cycling. Yes, but the implementation of a recursive routine relies on a stack of unpredictable size (the longest path length). If we got into  garbage collection, most likely it’s that we ran out of memory, precisely the kind of situation in which we cannot afford room for unpredictable stack growth.

In one of the early Eiffel garbage collectors, someone not aware of better techniques had actually written the traversal recursively; had the mistake not been caught early enough, it would no doubt have inflicted unbearable pain on humankind. Fortunately there is a solution: the Deutsch-Schorr-Waite algorithm [1], which avoids recursion on the program side by perverting the data structure to  replace some of the object links by recursion-control links; when the traversal’s execution proceeds along an edge, it reverses that edge to permit eventual return to the source. Strictly speaking, Deutsch-Schorr-Waite still requires a stack of booleans — to distinguish original edges from perverted ones — but we can avoid a separate stack (even just  a stack of booleans, which can be compactly represented in a few integers) by storing these booleans in the mark field of the objects themselves. The resulting traversal algorithm is a beauty — although it is fairly tricky, presents a challenge for verification tools, and raises new difficulties in a multi-threaded environment.

Deutsch-Schorr-Waite is a good example of “Small Memory Software” as studied in a useful book of the same title [2]. The need for Small Memory Software does not just arise for embedded programs running on small devices, but also in mainstream programming whenever we face the SBYBAW issue.

The SBYBAW lesson for the programmer is tough but simple. The resources we have at our disposal on a computing system may be huge, but they are always finite, and our programs’ appetite for resources will eventually exhaust them. At that stage, we have to deal with the SBYBAW rule, which sounds like a tautology but is an encouragement to look for clever algorithms:  techniques for freeing resources when no resources remain must not request new resources.

References

[1] Deutsch-Schorr-Waite is described in Knuth and also in [2]. Someone should start a Wikipedia entry.

[2] James Noble and Charles Weir: Small Memory Software: Patterns for Systems with Limited Memory, Addison-Wesley, 2001.

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Specifying user interfaces

Many blogs including this one rely on the WordPress software. In previous states of the present page you may have noticed a small WordPress bug, which I find interesting.

“Tags” are a nifty WordPress feature. When you post a message, you can specify one or more informative “tags”. The tags of all messages appear in the right sidebar, each with a smaller or bigger font size depending on the number of messages that specified it. You can click such a tag in the sidebar and get, on the left, a page containing all the associated messages.

Now assume that many posts use a particular tag; in our example it is “Design by Contract”, not unexpected for this blog. Assume further that the tag name is long. It is indeed in this case: 18 characters. As a side note, no problem would arise if I used normal spaces in the name, which would then appear on two or three lines; precisely to avoid this  I use HTML “non-breaking spaces”. This is probably not in the WordPress spirit, but any other long tag without spaces would create the same problem. That problem is a garbled display:

dbc_overflows

The long tag overflows the bluish browser area assigned to tags, producing an ugly effect. This behavior is hard to defend: either the tag should have been rejected as too long when the poster specified it or it should fit in its zone, whether by truncation or by applying a smaller font.

I quickly found a workaround, not nice but good enough: make sure that some short tag  (such as “Hoare”) appears much more often than the trouble-making tag. Since font size indicates the relative frequency of tags, the long one will be scaled down to a smaller font which fits.

Minor as it is, this WordPress glitch raises some general questions. First, is it really a bug? Assume, by a wild stretch of imagination, that a jury had to resolve this question; it could easily find an expert to answer positively, by stating that the behavior does not satisfy reasonable user expectations, and another who notes that it is not buggy behavior since it does not appear to violate any expressly stated property of the specification. (At least I did not find in the WordPress documentation any mention of either the display size of tags or a limit on tag length; if I missed it please indicate the reference.)

Is it a serious matter? Not in this particular example; uncomely Web display does not kill.   But the distinction between “small matter of esthetics” and software fault can be tenuous. We may note in particular that the possibility for large data to overflow its assigned area is a fundamental source of security risks; and even pure user interface issues can become life-threatening in the case of critical applications such as air-traffic control.

Our second putative expert is right, however: no behavior is buggy unless it contradicts a specification. Where will the spec be in such an example? There are three possibilities, each with its limitations.

The first solution is to expect that in a carefully developed system every such property will have to be specified. This is conceivable, but hard, and the question arises of how to make sure nothing has been forgotten. Past  some threshold of criticality and effort, the only specifications that count are formal; there is not that much literature on specifying user interfaces formally, since much of the work on formal specifications has understandably concentrated on issues thought to be more critical.

Because of the tediousness of specifying such general properties again and again for each case, it might be better  — this is the second solution — to specify them globally, for an entire system, or for the user interfaces of an entire class of systems. Like any serious effort at specification, if it is worth doing, it is worth doing formally.

In either of these approaches the question remains of how we know we have specified everything of interest. This question, specification completeness, is not as hopeless as most people think; I plan to write an entry about it sometime (hint:  bing for “guttag horning”). Still, it is hard to be sure you did not miss anything relevant. Remember this the next time formal methods advocates — who should know better — tell you that with their techniques there “no longer is a need to test”, or when you read about the latest OS kernel that is “guaranteed correct and secure”. However important formal methods and proofs are, they can only guarantee satisfaction of the properties that the specifier has considered and stated. To paraphrase someone [1], I would venture that

Proofs can only show the absence of envisaged bugs, never rule out the presence of unimagined ones.

This is one of the reasons why tests will always, regardless of the progress of proofs, remain an indispensable part of the software development landscape [2]. Whatever you have specified and proved, you will still want to run the system (or, for certain classes of embedded software, some simulation of it) and see the results for yourself.

What then if we do not explicitly specify the desired property (as we did in the two approaches considered so far) but testing or actual operation still reveals some behavior that is clearly unsatisfactory? On what basis do we complain to the software’s producer? A solution here, the third in our list, might be to rely on generally accepted standards of professional development. This is common in other kinds of engineering: if you commission someone to build you a house, the contract may not explicitly state that the roof should not fall on your head while you are asleep; when this happens, you will still sue and accuse the builder of malpractice. Such remedies can work for software too, but the rules are murkier because we have not accepted, or even just codified, a set of general professional practices that would cover such details as “no display of information should overflow its assigned area”.

Until then I will remember to use one short tag a lot.

References

[1] Edsger W. Dijksra, Notes on Structured Programming, in Dahl, Dijkstra, Hoare, Structured Programming, Academic Press, 1972.

[2]  See Tests And Proofs (TAP) conference series, since 2007. The next conference, program-chaired by Angelo Gargantini and Gordon Fraser, will take place in the week of the TOOLS Federated Conferences in Málaga, Spain, in the week of June 28, 2010.

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The good and the ugly

Once in a while one hits a tool that is just right. An example worth publicizing is the EasyChair system for conference management [1], which  — after a first experience as reviewer —  I have selected whenever I was in a position to make the choice for a new conference in recent years.

At first sight, a conference management system does not seem so hard to put together; it is in fact a traditional project topic for software engineering courses. But this apparent simplicity is deceptive, as a usable system must accommodate countless small and large needs. To take just one example, you can be a member of a program committee for a conference and also submit a paper to it; this implies strict rules about what you can see, for example reviews of other people’s papers with the referees’ names, and what you should not see. Taking care of myriad such rules and requirements requires in-depth domain knowledge about conferences, and a thorough analysis.

EasyChair is based on such an analysis. It knows what a conference is, and understands what its users need. Here for example is my login screen on EasyChair:

easychair

EasyChair knows about me: I only have one user name and one password. It knows the conferences in which I have been involved (and found them by itself). It knows about my various roles: chair, author etc., and will let me do different things depending on the role I choose.

The rest of the tool is up to the standards set by this initial screen. Granted, the Web design is very much vintage 1994; a couple of hours on the site by a professional graphics designer would not hurt, but, really, who cares? What matters is the functionality, and it is not by accident that EasyChair’s author is a brilliant logician [2]. Here is someone who truly understands the business of organizing and refereeing a conference, has translated this understanding into a solid logical model, and has at every step put himself in the shoes of the participants in the process. As a user you feel that everything has been done to make you feel comfortable  and perform efficiently, while protecting you from hassle.

Because this is all so simple and natural, you might forget that the system required extensive design. If you need proof, it suffices to consider, by contrast, the ScholarOne system, which as punishment for our sins both ACM and IEEE use for their journals.

Even after the last user still alive has walked away, ScholarOne will remain in the annals of software engineering, as a textbook illustration of how not to design a system and its user interface. Not the visuals; no doubt that site had a graphics designer. But everything is designed to make the system as repellent as possible for its users. You keep being asked for information that you have already entered. If you are a reviewer for Communications of the ACM and submit a paper to an IEEE Computer Society journal, the system does not remember you, since CACM has its own sub-site; you must re-enter everything. Since your identifier is your email address, you will have two passwords with the same id, which confuses the browser. (I keep forgetting the appropriate password, which the site obligingly emails me, in clear.) IEEE publications have a common page, but here is how it looks:

scholarone-detail

See the menu on the right? It is impossible  to see the full names of each of the “Transactio…”. (No tooltips, of course.) Assume you just want to know what one of them is, for example “th-cs”: if you select it you are prompted to provide all kinds of information (which you have entered before for other publications), before you can even proceed.

This user interface design (the minuscule menu, an example of what Scott Meyers calls the “Keyhole problem” [3]) is only a small part of usability flaws that plague the system. The matter is one of design: the prevailing viewpoint is that of the  designers and administrators, not the users. I was not really surprised when I found out that the system comes from the same source as the ISI Web of Science system (which should never be used for computer science, see [4]).

It is such a pleasure in contrast to see a system like EasyChair  — for all I know a one-man effort — with its attention to user needs, its profound understanding of the problem domain, and its constant improvements over the years.

References

[1] EasyChair system, at http://www.easychair.org.

[2] Andrei Voronkov, http://www.voronkov.com/.

[3] Scott Meyers, The Keyhole Problem, at http://www.aristeia.com/TKP/draftPaper.pdf; see also slides at http://se.ethz.ch/~meyer/publications/OTHERS/scott_meyers/keyhole.pdf

[4]  Bertrand Meyer, Christine Choppy, Jan van Leeuwen, Jørgen Staunstrup: Research Evaluation for Computer Science, in  Communications  of the ACM, vol. 52, no. 4, pages 131-134, online at http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1498765.1498780 (requires subscription). Longer version, available at http://www.informatics-europe.org/docs/research_evaluation.pdf (free access).

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