Archive for the ‘Seminar’ Category.

New session of online Agile course starts now

Just about a year ago I posted this announcement about my just released Agile course:

In spite of all the interest in both agile methods and MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) there are few courses on agile methods; I know only of some specialized MOOCs focused on a particular language or method.

I produced for EdX, with the help of Marco Piccioni, a new MOOC entitled Agile Software Development. It starts airing today and is supported by exercises and quizzes. The course uses some of the material from my Agile book.

The course is running again! You can find it on EdX here.

Such online courses truly “run”: they are not just canned videos but include exercises and working material on which you can get feedback.

Like the book (“Agile: The Good, the Hype and the Ugly“, Springer), the course is a tutorial on agile methods, presenting an unbiased analysis of their benefits and limits.

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Software for Robotics: 2016 LASER summer school, 10-18 September, Elba

The 2016 session of the LASER summer school, now in its 13th edition, has just been announced. The theme is new for the school, and timely: software for robotics. Below is the announcement.

School site: here

The 2016 LASER summer school will be devoted to Software for Robotics. It takes place from 10 to 18 September in the magnificent setting of the Hotel del Golfo in Procchio, Elba Island, Italy.

Robotics is progressing at an amazing pace, bringing improvements to almost areas of human activity. Today’s robotics systems rely ever more fundamentally on complex software, raising difficult issues. The LASER 2016 summer school both covers the current state of robotics software technology and open problems. The lecturers are top international experts with both theoretical contributions and major practical achievements in developing robotics systems.
The LASER school is intended for professionals from the industry (engineers and managers) as well as university researchers, including PhD students. Participants learn about the most important software technology advances from the pioneers in the field. The school’s focus is applied, although theory is welcome to establish solid foundations. The format of the school favors extensive interaction between participants and speakers.
The speakers include:

  • Joydeep Biswas, University of Massachussetts, on Development, debugging, and maintenance of deployed robots
  • Davide Brugali, University of Bergamo, on Managing software variability in robotic control systems
  • Nenad Medvidovic, University of Southern California, on Software Architectures of Robotics Systems
  • Bertrand Meyer, Politecnico di Milano and Innopolis University, with Jiwon Shin, on Concurrent Object-Oriented Robotics Software: Concepts, Framework and Applications
  • Issa Nesnas, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, on Experiences from robotic software development for research and planetary flight robots
  • Richard Vaughan, Simon Fraser University

Organized by Politecnico di Milano, the school takes place at the magnificent Hotel del Golfo (http://www.hoteldelgolfo.it/) in Golfo di Procchio, Elba. Along with an intensive scientific program, participants will have time to enjoy the natural and cultural riches of this history-laden jewel of the Mediterranean.

For more information about the school, the speakers and registration see here.

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— Bertrand Meyer

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Understanding and assessing Agile: free ACM webinar next Wednesday

ACM is offering this coming Wednesday a one-hour webinar entitled Agile Methods: The Good, the Hype and the Ugly. It will air on February 18 at 1 PM New York time (10 AM West Coast, 18 London, 19 Paris, see here for more cities). The event is free and the registration link is here.

The presentation is based on my recent book with an almost identical title [1]. It will be a general discussion of agile methods, analyzing both their impressive contributions to software engineering and their excesses, some of them truly damaging. It is often hard to separate the beneficial from the indifferent and the plain harmful, because most of the existing presentations are of the hagiographical kind, gushing in admiration of the sacred word. A bit of critical distance does not hurt.

As you can see from the Amazon page, the first readers (apart from a few dissenters, not a surprise for such a charged topic) have relished this unprejudiced, no-nonsense approach to the presentation of agile methods.

Another characteristic of the standard agile literature is that it exaggerates the contrast with classic software engineering. This slightly adolescent attitude is not helpful; in reality, many of the best agile ideas are the direct continuation of the best classic ideas, even when they correct or adapt them, a normal phenomenon in technology evolution. In the book I tried to re-place agile ideas in this long-term context, and the same spirit will also guide the webinar. Ideological debates are of little interest to software practitioners; what they need to know is what works and what does not.

References

[1] Bertrand Meyer, Agile! The Good, the Hype and the Ugly, Springer, 2014, see Amazon page here, publisher’s page here and my own book page here.

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Saint Petersburg Software Engineering Seminar: 14 January 2014 (6 PM)

There will be two talks in the Software Engineering Seminar at ITMO, 18:00 local time, Tuesday, January 14, 2014. Please arrive 10 minutes early for registration.

Place: ITMO, Sytninskaya Ulitsa, Saint Petersburg.

Andrey Terekhov (SPBGU): Programming crystals

(I do not know whether this talk will be in Russian or English. An abstract follows but the talk is meant as the start of a discussion rather than a formal lecture.)

В течение последних 20-30 лет основными языками программирования кристаллов были VHDL и Verilog. Эти языки изначально проектировались как средства создания проектной документации, потом они стали использоваться в качестве инструмента моделирования и только сравнительно недавно для этих языков появились средства генерации кода уровня RTL (Register Transfer Language). Тексты на  VHDL и Verilog очень громоздки, трудно читаемые, плохо стандартизованы (одна и та же программа может синтезироваться на одном инструменте и не поддаваться синтезу на другом. Лет 10 назад появился язык SystemC – это С++ с огромным набором библиотек. С одной стороны, любая программа на SystemC может транслироваться стандартными трансляторами С++ , есть удобные средства потактного моделирования и приличные средства генгерации RTL, с другой стороны, требование совместимости с С++ не прошло даром – если в базовом языке нет средств описания параллелизма и конвейеризации, их приходится добавлять весьма искусственными приемами через приставные библиотеки. Буквально в прошлом году фирма Xilinx выпустила продукт Vivado, в рекламе которого утверждается, что он способен автоматически транслировать обычные программы на С/C++ в RTL промышленного качества.

Мы выполнили несколько экспериментов по использованию этого продукта, оказалось, что обещанной автоматизации там нет, пользователь должен писать на С, постоянно думая о том, как его код будет выглядеть в финальном RTL,  расставлять огромное количество прагм, причем не всегда очевидных.

Основной тезис доклада – такая важная область, как проектирование кристаллов, нуждается в специализированных языковых и инструментальных средствах, обеспечивающих  создание компактных и  легко читаемых программ, которые могут быть использованы как для симуляции, так и для генерации эффективного RTL. В докладе будут приведены примеры программ на языке HaSCoL (Hardware and Software Codesign Language), разработанном на кафедре системного программирования СПбГУ, и даны некоторые сравнительные характеристики.

Sergey Velder (ITMO): Alias graphs

(My summary – BM.) In the ITMO SEL work on automatic alias analysis, a new model has been developed: alias graphs, an abstraction of the object structure. This short talk will compare it to previously used approaches.

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Ershov lecture

 

On April 11 I gave the “Ershov lecture” in Novosibirsk. I talked about concurrency; a video recording is available here.

The lecture is given annually in memory of Andrey P. Ershov, one of the founding fathers of Russian computer science and originator of many important concepts such as partial evaluation. According to Wikipedia, Knuth considers Ershov to be the inventor of hashing. I was fortunate to make Ershov’s acquaintance in the late seventies and to meet him regularly afterwards. He invited me to his institute in Novosibirsk for a two-month stay where I learned a lot. He had a warm, caring personality, and set many young computer scientists in their tracks. His premature death in 1988 was a shock to all and his memory continues to be revered; it was gratifying to be able to give the lecture named in his honor.

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Public lecture at ITMO

I am giving my “inaugural lecture” at ITMO in Saint Petersburg tomorrow (Thursday, 28 February 2013) at 14 (2 PM) local time, meaning e.g. 11 AM in Western Europe and 2 AM (ouch!) in California. See here for the announcement. The title is “Programming: Magic, Art, Routine or Science?“. The talk will be streamed live: see here.

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SP software engineering seminar (web-streamed): talks by H. Gall and L. Baresi, Thursday, 5 July

On Thursday, July 5 at 15 Saint Petersburg time (7 AM New York, noon London, 13 Paris/Brussels/Zurich/Milan), the Saint Petersburg software engineering seminar presents two talks, streamed over the Internet:

  • Firat hour:  Luciano Baresi, Politecnico di Milano: A-3: A Middleware for Self-organizing Pervasive Systems
  • Second hour: Harald Gall, University of Zurich: Software Assessment with Software Sensing and Bug Smelling

See abstracts and other details on the <a href=”http://sel.ifmo.ru/seminar/” target=”blog_illustrations”><span style=”color: #0000ff; text-decoration: underline;”>seminar page</span></a>.

The seminar will be streamed over the Internet at the usual address: <a href=”Software Assessment with Software Sensing and Bug Smelling” target=”blog_illustrations”><span style=”color: #0000ff; text-decoration: underline;”>Software Assessment with Software Sensing and Bug Smelling</span></a>. Please join us for two exciting presentations!

 

 

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Aliasing and framing: Saint Petersburg seminar next week

In  last Thursday’s session of the seminar, Kokichi Futatsugi’s talk took longer than planned (and it would have been a pity to stop him), so I postponed my own talk on Automatic inference of frame conditions through the alias calculus to next week (Thursday local date). As usual it will be broadcast live.

Seminar page: here, including the link to follow the webcast.

Time and date: 5 April 2012, 18 Saint Petersburg time; you can see the local time at your location here.

Abstract:

Frame specifications, the description of what does not change in a routine call, are one of the most annoying components of verification, in particular for object-oriented software. Ideally frame conditions should be inferred automatically. I will present how the alias calculus, described in recent papers, can address this need.

There may be a second talk, on hybrid systems, by Sergey Velder.

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Seminar sessions in Saint Petersburg: CafeOBJ and the frame issue

The Saint Petersburg software engineering seminar has two sessions today (29 March 2012, 18 local time, see here for the date and time in your area), broadcast live:

  • By Kokichi Futatsugi from KAIST (Japan): Combining Inference and Search in Verification with CafeOBJ.
  • By me: Automatic inference of frame conditions through the alias calculus.

See details including the link for the live webcast on the seminar page. The page also includes links to video recordings of recent sessions.

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