Informatics education in Europe: Just the facts


In 2005 a number of us started Informatics Europe [1], the association of university departments and industrial research labs in computer science in Europe. The association has now grown to 80 members across the entire continent; it organizes the annual European Computer Science Summit and has published a number of influential reports. The last one just came out: Informatics Education in Europe: Institutions, Degrees, Students, Positions, Salaries — Key Data 2008-2012 [2]. The principal author is Cristina Pereira, who collected and organized the relevant data over more than a year; I helped with the preparation of the final text.

At the beginning of Informatics Europe we considered with particular attention  the model of the Computing Research Association [3], which played a crucial role in giving computer science (informatics) its due place in the US academic landscape. Several past and current officers of the CRA,  such as Willy Zwaenepoel, Ed Lazowska, Bob Constable, Andy Bernat, Jeannette Wing, Moshe Vardi and J Strother Moore gave keynotes at our early conferences and we of course asked them for the secrets of their organization’s success. One answer that struck us was the central role played by data collection. Just gathering the  facts, such as degrees and salaries, established for the first time a solid basis for serious discussions. We took this advice to heart and the report is the first result.

Gathering the information is particularly difficult for Europe given the national variations and the absence of centralized statistical data. Even the list of names under which institutions teach informatics in Europe fills a large table in the report. Cristina’s decision was, from the start, to favor quality over quantity: to focus on impeccable data for countries for which we could get it, rather than trying to cover the whole continent with data of variable credibility.

The result is the first systematic repository of basic information on informatics education in Europe: institutions, degrees offered and numbers awarded, student numbers, position titles and definitions, and (a section which will not please everyone) salaries for PhD students, postdocs and professors of various ranks.

The report is a first step; it only makes sense if we can regularly continue to update it and particularly extend it to other countries. But even in its current form (and with the obvious observation that my opinion is not neutral)  I see it as a major step forward for the discipline in Europe. We need an impeccable factual basis to convince the public at large and political decision-makers to give informatics the place it deserves in today’s educational systems.


[1] Informatics Europe site, see here.

[2] Cristina Pereira and Bertrand Meyer: Informatics Education in Europe: Institutions, Degrees, Students, Positions, Salaries — Key Data 2008-2012, Informatics Europe report, 30 September 2013, available here.

[3] Computing Research Association (US), see here.


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